Moving: ‘Plug’ n ‘Play’ houses mean a lot to a young couple in Martinborough


NOTICE: After watching eight of these Moving house Now shows, I think the young couple in this episode have the right idea – a brand new “plug ‘n’ play” house that arrives all ready to move into.

The house has rugs, a kitchen, a bathroom and no painting is needed anywhere. All the movers have to do is hook up the water, sewer, and electricity, and they’re good to go.

But it’s not just one house, and that’s what makes it seem such a godsend. Jacob Emery and Teresa Ross are moving and “installing” two houses for $ 550,000. The main house is a very large four bedroom house and the other is a fully detached two bedroom guest house.

Jacob Emery and Teresa Ross swap the heavy smoke for quaint and calm Martinborough.

SCREENSHOT

Jacob Emery and Teresa Ross swap the heavy smoke for quaint and calm Martinborough.

Of course, you don’t get the character of an old villa or a large stud farm, but you don’t have to wield a paintbrush or replace rotten wooden planks. While the old villas look great, they are consuming a lot more money, and it’s on the way.

READ MORE:
* Moving: Couple buy invisible sight during lockdown, then move out
* Moving: retire with a century-old chalet moved
* Moving: spooky night trip to a large old villa split in two

Jacob Emery and Teresa Ross and their dogs live in Wellington. They like the idea of ​​a rural life but don’t want to buy a farm. Martinborough, with its vineyards and olive groves, caught their attention

Both houses are ready from Auckland.

PROVIDED

Both houses are ready from Auckland.

Jacob, a top tennis coach, and Teresa, who works for the Ministry of Education, want to build a tennis academy with crushed red brick courts imported from Italy – just like the clay courts where they play Roland-Garros. Jacob says the top 100 tennis players all grew up playing on clay, so there is reasoning behind the project.

Martinborough is a quaint little village which has a microclimate with perfect conditions for growing grapes, but apparently also good for clay tennis courts (not too much rain, but all it does is rain when they come to film).

They have a large plot of land for their homes – the guesthouse will be for players and coaches.

Their houses come from Transbuild in Auckland – they only took 12 weeks to build. We see the couple see their nearly finished houses for the first time in the courtyard: “Wow, that’s a lot bigger than I had in my head, that’s for sure,” Jacob said, looking at the taller one.

Stopped by the snow - the crew crammed into Gayford's room in TaupÃ… ??  while chatting online with Jacob and Teresa.

PROVIDED

Stopped by the snow – the crew crammed into Gayford’s room in TaupÃ… ?? while chatting online with Jacob and Teresa.

The biggest house is certainly big, and it is not a cookie-cutter house; it has been personalized.

We meet Andrews Housemovers’ Damian Tupea again – he was in charge of moving Remuera’s big old villa in the first episode. You just know you can trust this guy.

It’s a long trip, maybe over two nights (make it three), via this mountainous road between Taupō and Napier. And of course, it’s not a picnic. Notice, there was a bad forecast for a southern storm blowing over the island.

“We’re going to experience some strong winds and a lot of rain on the way down,” Tupea admits. “It ultimately tends to encroach on our schedule. At the end of the day, we have to think about security.

Gayford is a little anxious (again). With reason. Who wants a snowstorm in the middle of the night? The trucker is wearing shorts. (“Go put on some pants, mate. You’re chilling me,” Gayford says when they stop in Tokoroa to refuel.

The hours on the road pass and Gayford tempts Damian with chocolate and candy. “Did you bring the whole dairy with you, mate?” “

The trucks pass very close to the oncoming trucks in the dark, and the weather deteriorates as they head south.

At the fork in the Taupō-Napier road, one of the pilots relayed the bad news. The road is about to close. The southern storm hit the hills and the temperature is dropping. It’s snowing – they walk past a snow plow.

Damian makes the call. “Get the houses out of the way. So they pull over and the guys go back to Taupō for breakfast and a bed.

Negotiating bridges creates breathtaking moments.

SCREENSHOT

Negotiating bridges creates breathtaking moments.

The house is raised almost as high as possible to clear this bridge.

PROVIDED

The house is raised almost as high as possible to clear this bridge.

But when they get home early in the evening, the road is blocked, and they can’t even get back to the parked houses. Later, they’re allowed to drop by to check, but they don’t get anywhere until at least another day. And the snow continues to fall.

On the third day, they finally head to Napier and Dannevirke, Paihiatua and Eketāhuna, where they have to take a narrow ring road to avoid a bridge that they cannot cross.

And it’s another bridge that stops them dead. They should elevate the house almost as high as possible. It is on an alarming angle.

There are more problems when they get to the site – it’s a sharp turn in the field and the house completely blocks the road.

And the ground is waterlogged, which is proving a tough job for truckers, who use a variety of mats under the wheels. The truck with the second house gets stuck, so a tractor comes to the aid and gets stuck as well. A second tractor arrives and, yes, it gets stuck too. (Don’t you like these scenes?)

The extraordinary length of the main house is easy to see from the side.

PROVIDED

The extraordinary length of the main house is easy to see from the side.

The next day, everyone is back to try to sort it out. There is an excavator which clears a large part of the loose soil, and finally the truck moves. This is the thing about Moving house – there always seems to be a solution. Just throw more heavy machinery at the problem.

Big revelation

Gayford returns in the spring – the leaves are on the vines and everything is very pretty.

There are a lot of fences around the houses and terraces in the front. And the couple are delighted with their new homes and the countryside setting – they wake up to the sight of a vineyard.

The couple have just moved into their house, and it already feels like home.

SCREENSHOT

The couple have just moved into their house, and it already feels like home.

The main house is large with a large kitchen and utility room. And even the two bedroom house seems like the perfect guesthouse.

The tennis courts haven’t been built yet, but they have 120 tons of clay in Italy, so it will happen. It would be great if we could see the end result someday.

Jacob and Teresa say they could go over budget by about $ 50,000 by the time they’re done, but we still think $ 550,000 for two houses moved is a lot.

What about Gayford’s move-in gift? In the meantime, a set of swing tennis balls “to make them go back”. Jacob looks suitably unimpressed.

Moving Houses screens on TVNZ 1 on Tuesdays, 7:30 p.m. and TVNZ OnDemand

Auspicious rainbow - the main house is finally in place.

PROVIDED

Auspicious rainbow – the main house is finally in place.


Comments are closed.