Dogs lifespan – Club Fuer Molosser http://club-fuer-molosser.net/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 04:46:11 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-88.png Dogs lifespan – Club Fuer Molosser http://club-fuer-molosser.net/ 32 32 Stevens Nation Responds to FDA Filing Denial Letter, NurOwn Recipients Call for Advisory Committee Meeting https://club-fuer-molosser.net/stevens-nation-responds-to-fda-filing-denial-letter-nurown-recipients-call-for-advisory-committee-meeting/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 04:25:00 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/stevens-nation-responds-to-fda-filing-denial-letter-nurown-recipients-call-for-advisory-committee-meeting/ FDA’s decision doesn’t follow administration’s own guidelines and ignores evidence of NurOwn’s effectiveness An advisory committee meeting is needed to give patients a voice and to provide a transparent review of the impact of NurOwn WASHINGTON, November 21, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics is seeking FDA approval for its mesenchymal stem cell therapy called […]]]>

FDA’s decision doesn’t follow administration’s own guidelines and ignores evidence of NurOwn’s effectiveness

An advisory committee meeting is needed to give patients a voice and to provide a transparent review of the impact of NurOwn

WASHINGTON, November 21, 2022 /PRNewswire/ — Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics is seeking FDA approval for its mesenchymal stem cell therapy called NurOwn for the treatment of ALS. In response to the FDA’s denial of filing letter, and as individuals who have participated in the NurOwn trials and its Expanded Access Program (“EAP”), we support Brainstorm’s efforts to request an advisory committee meeting. (“AdCom”).

We believe the FDA’s position ignores the extensive evidence of effectiveness and denies both the company’s and patients’ rights to due process. Additionally, we believe the letter does not meet the FDA’s own guidelines. An AdCom will review the full spectrum of data and give voice to trial participants, drug sponsor, investigating neurologists and treating clinicians. We must insist that the FDA allow testimonials about the “clinically significant” changes that occurred when we received NurOwn.

In its quarterly call, Brainstorm outlined the FDA’s position in the Refusal to File letter. The FDA concluded there was no “substantial evidence” of efficacy because the Phase III study did not meet its primary endpoint. However, the phase III trial met a pre-specified secondary endpoint in a subgroup of patients with less advanced ALS.

For more than five years, the ALS community has fought for adoption of an FDA guidance document for ALS, which was implemented in 2019. It provides that evidence of an effect of treatment can be assessed by “less decline, stabilization or improvement” of function. In addition, objective results of “even a small magnitude” can demonstrate efficacy.

Two of the most critical commitments made in this guidance document were: (1) the FDA’s willingness to “exercise regulatory flexibility” for the “critical unmet need” in ALS; and (2) willingness to consider “patient-reported results” as proof of effectiveness.

The FDA assesses whether there is substantial evidence of effectiveness by asking whether a therapy has a “clinically meaningful” impact. Essentially, how does a therapy make a person “feel and function?” The people who can best attest to how NurOwn made them “feel and function” are the people who received NurOwn. Indeed, in a 2019 patient listening session with CDER and CBER leadership, the FDA promised the ALS community: “If it helps you work and you can prove it, we’ll approve it!”

We’re asking the FDA to let us prove it.

After receiving NurOwn, each of us halted the decline of ALS and improved in certain functional areas. Here are some of our daily activity changes that prove NurOwn works.

  • walking without a walker, walking longer distances, walking in sand or in an agricultural field
  • get up from a chair without help and get up from the floor without help
  • going up and down stairs
  • ride in a four-wheel-drive vehicle
  • decrease or cessation of fasciculations
  • better balance and less falls while walking
  • put our arms over our heads and wash our bodies and hair unaided
  • use the bathroom or hold a urinal
  • open water bottles, pill boxes and food jars
  • hold a pen to write
  • use a cell phone for texting and typing
  • speak more clearly without needing a caregiver to translate
  • pull the throttle on a lawn mower and push the lawn mower to mow the grass
  • grab a glass and lift it to drink
  • operate a wheelchair with one finger
  • throw a ball to the dogs or throw stones with the children
  • swallowing dense foods like fried chicken, rice, sushi
  • talking for longer periods between using bipap
  • breathe harder as evidenced by improved FVC

Thanks to these feature enhancements after receiving NurOwn, we were able to create memories with our families while camping, week-long vacations at Disneyworld, attending our children’s graduations, celebrating birthdays, and watching the birth of our children.

We further believe that the FDA cannot assess whether a therapy has a “clinically meaningful” impact without allowing scientific discourse and hearing the opinions of the world’s most esteemed ALS neurologists who were the principal investigators of the trials and EAP. With decades of expertise in ALS, they are the only people in the world who have seen clinical data and biomarkers, as well as observe how we function in clinics. Many of our neurologists have publicly and privately expressed the belief that NurOwn works. Any scientific discourse on how NurOwn works must include the scientists who know it best.

Additionally, many of us would also like to offer opinions from other medical professionals such as unaffiliated neurologists, pulmonologists and physiotherapists, who can attest to the changes they have observed during clinic visits.

For instance, Paula Smith is the mother of Josh Smith. She said:

My son Josh is 33 years old. He was participating in the NurOwn trial and both EAPs. Josh was diagnosed in March 2019, and he still walks, talks, eats and breathes. During EAP, my son’s pulmonologist documented a 41% improvement in his respiratory function. Our outside doctors can’t believe the changes in my son.

Combined with the many patient-reported results like this, the “totality of evidence” in the trials and the EAP proves that NurOwn had a clinical and biological effect. We call on the FDA to exercise its promised regulatory flexibility. We ask for the opportunity to share our evidence at an advisory committee meeting. We are proof that NurOwn works. Please don’t let us die while we wait.

About the NurOwn Trial and EAP Participants

Collectively, we are the patients and family members of patients who participated in NurOwn trials and expanded access. One of us participated in the NurOwn phase II trial in 2015, which has now been opened. The rest of us participated in the phase III trial from 2017 to 2019, which has not yet been unblinded; however, each of us received doses of NurOwn under the expanded access program in 2021 and 2022.

  • Eric Stevens (33). California. Extended access to UC Irvine.
    Appearance of symptoms in March 2019. Diagnosed with ALS in September 2019.
  • Matt Klingenberg (37). South Dakota. Extended access to Mayo.
    Appearance of symptoms in November 2017. Diagnosed with ALS in March 2018.
  • Josh Smith (33). Pennsylvania. Extended access to UMass.
    Appearance of symptoms in June 2018. Diagnosed with ALS in March 2019.
  • Phil Green (52). California. Extended access to UC Irvine.
    Appearance of symptoms in June 2017. Diagnosed with ALS in August 2018.
  • Roberto Muggli (47). Costa Rica and Minnesota. Extended access to Mayo.
    Appearance of symptoms in the spring of 2017. Diagnosed with ALS in December 2017.
  • Kylan Morris for his mother, Sandy Morris. California. Expanded access to CPMC.
    Appearance of symptoms August 2017. Diagnosed with ALS in January 2018.
    Died pending at age 56 in 2022.
  • Nicole Cimbura for her husband, mike cimbura. Colorado. Phase II trial in Mayo.
    Appearance of symptoms in May 2014. Diagnosed with ALS in January 2015.
    Died pending at age 53 in 2019.

About the NurOwn FDA Filing Denial Letter

On November 10, 2022, Brainstorm Cell Therapeutics has announced that the United States Food and Drug Administration has issued a letter of denial of filing (“RTF”) for its investigational biological treatment, a mesenchymal stem cell therapy called NurOwn. On November 14, 2022In its quarterly call, Brainstorm provided more information about the reasons for the RTF letter from the FDA and its intention to request a Type A meeting with the FDA to discuss the way forward for its therapy.

About amyotrophic lateral sclerosis

Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (“ALS”) is a rare, progressive and fatal neurodegenerative disease that paralyzes you before it kills you. It causes the loss of motor neurons in the brain and spinal cord. These motor neurons are responsible for communicating with voluntary muscles. As ALS progresses, people with ALS experience muscle weakness and atrophy, which causes them to lose the ability to move, speak, eat, swallow, and eventually breathe. The average life expectancy for people with ALS is three to five years from the onset of symptoms, but life expectancy varies, with 50% of the population dying within two years. According to the CDC’s ALS registry, approximately 6,000 people are diagnosed with ALS each year and 32,000 people live with the disease. Unfortunately, 500,000 people living today will have ALS in their lifetime.

SOURCEStevens Nation

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Animal advocates say treatment of turkeys is nothing to be grateful for https://club-fuer-molosser.net/animal-advocates-say-treatment-of-turkeys-is-nothing-to-be-grateful-for/ Sat, 19 Nov 2022 20:00:00 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/animal-advocates-say-treatment-of-turkeys-is-nothing-to-be-grateful-for/ LOS ANGELES — For the overwhelming majority of Americans, turkey is the Thanksgiving dinner of choice. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, approximately 250 million turkeys are killed each year in the United States, including more than 46 million eaten during the holidays. And the National Turkey Federation says 88% of Americans surveyed […]]]>

LOS ANGELES — For the overwhelming majority of Americans, turkey is the Thanksgiving dinner of choice.

According to the United States Department of Agriculture, approximately 250 million turkeys are killed each year in the United States, including more than 46 million eaten during the holidays. And the National Turkey Federation says 88% of Americans surveyed eat a turkey on Thanksgiving.

But animal advocates want these people to know that the lives of most animals on their plate are short and filled with relentless suffering.

The Humane League, an international non-profit organization working to end the abuse of animals raised for food, says factory farming “turns turkeys from curious, independent birds into products for the human consumption”.

“Life on a factory farm is a stark contrast to the freedom of turkeys,” the group says. “Instead of being hatched alongside a handful of siblings, coming into the world in a comfortable nest built by loving parents, farmed turkeys are born in sterile, covered hatcheries where thousands of eggs hatch at the same time. radiators instead of the heat that would be provided by the mother’s body. … These barns prevent turkeys from enjoying a natural social order or exploring their environment. Their wings will never lift them into the air. They will remain permanently anchored before meeting. their untimely end in a slaughterhouse.”

Animal advocates describe turkeys as normally social and playful birds that enjoy the company of others, enjoy having their feathers stroked, and have as varied a personality as dogs and cats. But they say turkeys born on factory farms never meet their mothers or have a chance to smell the sunlight, are raised in indoor barns crammed with hundreds or even thousands of other turkeys, and lack the ability to play, exercise, or even sleep properly.

The groups say factory-farmed turkeys often become aggressive towards each other in ways they wouldn’t in the wild due to overcrowded barns, inflicting bodily harm, infection and sometimes death. To avoid loss of income from such violence, farms sometimes perform painful procedures of beak trimming and removal of the birds’ sharp talons.

Unnatural growth is also a problem in the eyes of many.

“Turkeys have been genetically engineered to gain weight quickly because fatter turkeys mean bigger wallets for farmers,” according to People For the Ethical Treatment of Animals. “But in the wild, the athletic prowess of the turkey is impressive. Wild turkeys can fly at speeds of up to 55 miles per hour and run at speeds of up to 25 miles per hour.”

PETA also notes that a turkey’s natural lifespan can be up to 10 years, “but on factory farms they are slaughtered when they are only 5 months old.”

Finally, there is the manner of death. Turkeys are considered poultry and are therefore excluded from the federal Humane Slaughtering Practices Act, which aims to ensure that farm animals die as painlessly as possible. Advocacy groups say millions of turkeys are subjected to ‘chain slaughter’, in which they are hung upside down with their legs clamped in metal chains, then plunged into electrified water intended to stun them. Conveyor belts then drag them on blades that slit their throats before throwing them into a hot bath of plucking.

The National Turkey Federation, a group formed in 1940 to market the animals as food, did not respond to a request for comment on those concerns, but the group says on its website that the turkeys are “raised in barns specially designed and environmentally controlled that provide maximum protection from predators, disease and extreme weather conditions.Except for breeding and transportation purposes, turkeys are allowed to roam freely within their home.

The group further states that “The health and welfare of growing turkeys is a priority for turkey farmers as they routinely patrol barns for signs that could prove problematic. … For s To ensure animal welfare practices are followed throughout the industry, the National Turkey Federation works closely with turkey farmers, veterinarians and industry experts across the United States to develop and maintain strict standards of conduct and animal care guidelines to raise healthy birds in a safe environment through every stage of a turkey’s life cycle animal treatment, production of healthy meat and quality, respect and value for our workers and the rational use of land and water resources.”

Despite the ubiquity of the turkey dinner, families celebrating Thanksgiving have other meatless options. The leading vegan option for holiday dinners is Tofurkey, an Oregon-based company founded in 1980 by self-proclaimed teacher, naturalist, and hippie Seth Tibbott. The company launched its tofu-based Holiday Roast in 1995, and Saturday Tofurkey roasts and other products are available in many Southland supermarkets. The company also advocates for animal welfare and donates to animal shelters and environmental causes.

Several other companies have followed suit and developed their own vegan roasts in recent years, including Gardein, Field Roast and Trader Joe’s, giving customers plenty of holiday choices.

Veggie Grill, a nationwide vegan restaurant chain that opened its first restaurant in Irvine in 2006, has made a “Thanksgiving Classics” pre-prepared meal kit available for pre-order this year at its various locations. of Los Angeles and Orange counties. It feeds four people for $75 and includes a Plant-Based Turkey Wellington with Walnut Mushroom Stuffing, Mac and Cheese, Roasted Garlic Mashed Potatoes with Porcini Sauce, Green Beans with Dairy Free Butter and cranberry sauce.

For those who want to help turkeys, Farm Sanctuary is once again sponsoring its annual “Adopt a Turkey” campaign. For a one-time donation of $35, people can symbolically adopt a rescued turkey or sponsor an entire flock for $150, allowing the animals to live their natural lives on one of the group’s two spacious farms, including one in Acton in the Antelope. Valley. Sponsors receive a certificate with their adopted turkey’s photo and biography, including their rescue story. Many of the stories of their rescued turkeys can be viewed at www.farmsanctuary.org/adopt-a-turkey.

“We celebrate turkeys as living, vibrant, social, emotional and sentient beings,” Farm Sanctuary said in a post on its website in October. The group describes turkeys as “bright, social, and sensitive creatures” who “form loving relationships, have strong, distinct personalities, and deserve a safe life.”

Little Hill Sanctuary, a small nonprofit in central California, is also offering people the opportunity to sponsor a rescued turkey during the month of November. Program information is available at https://littlehillsanctuary.org/sponsor-a-turkey-for-thanksliving/.

PETA offers vegan recipes, shopping tips, and tips for answering tough questions that might arise at the dinner table on its website, as well as a free vegan starter kit available to order.

Officials at the Midnight Mission, which serves about 2,500 people in Skid Row each Thanksgiving Day, told the City News Service they don’t get many vegetarian or vegan requests at giveaways. Those who don’t want to eat meat can choose to leave food off their plate and add more vegetables and sides.

Georgia Berkovich, the mission’s director of public affairs, said the group typically receives no more than three vegan or vegetarian requests during its regular meal services, in which 500 to 1,000 meals are served per day.

“So for Thanksgiving, maybe we’ll have a few,” she said.

Those who prefer to avoid eating the birds may have a tough time during Thanksgiving, when it can seem like they’re swimming against the cultural tide. But they maintain hope that society will move beyond a tradition they see as contradicting the warm feelings of gratitude that Thanksgiving is meant to represent.

“People are choosing to celebrate a bird-free Thanksgiving for many reasons this year,” said PETA manager and spokesperson Catie Cryar. “In addition to the 2022 turkey price spike and rampant bird flu outbreaks, former workers at ‘humane’ turkey supplier Plainville Farms were recently charged with animal cruelty after an undercover investigation PETA showed them kicking and stomping birds.”

Generation Vegan, a global non-profit organization dedicated to educating people about the environmental, ethical, and health benefits of adopting a plant-based lifestyle, invites people on its website to ask, “How do we feel about removing so much from an animal to demonstrate our gratitude for all we have?”

“When we consider numbers as large as 46 million, it’s easy to forget that each of these animals is an individual with their own personality, preferences, behaviors and abilities,” the group explains.

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5 minors and 2 adults attacked by dogs in Atlantic City NJ https://club-fuer-molosser.net/5-minors-and-2-adults-attacked-by-dogs-in-atlantic-city-nj/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 03:22:30 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/5-minors-and-2-adults-attacked-by-dogs-in-atlantic-city-nj/ Seven people, including five minors between the ages of 10 and 17, are recovering after being bitten by a pair of dogs in Atlantic City on Tuesday afternoon. The Atlantic City Police Department said the incident happened just before 3:45 p.m. in the 1300 block of Baltic Avenue. A preliminary investigation determined that two minors […]]]>

Seven people, including five minors between the ages of 10 and 17, are recovering after being bitten by a pair of dogs in Atlantic City on Tuesday afternoon.

The Atlantic City Police Department said the incident happened just before 3:45 p.m. in the 1300 block of Baltic Avenue.

A preliminary investigation determined that two minors were walking their dogs in a fenced area when those dogs encountered a third dog.

The dogs became aggressive towards each other, prompting them to break free from the juveniles.

Without warning, it appears the dogs then turned on the juveniles and began attacking them.

Other people tried to help the children who were attacked, but they too were bitten.

In total, two adults, aged 37 and 62, and five minors, aged 10, 13, 13, 15 and 17, were bitten by the dogs.

All seven victims were taken to AtlantiCare Regional Medical Center-City Division for treatment of serious but not life-threatening injuries.

The dogs were eventually contained and remain in the custody of animal control pending the outcome of the investigation.

Video posted to Scan AtlanticCity’s Facebook page allegedly shows the attack (warning: the video may be graphic for some).

WATCH: Here are 30 toxic foods for dogs

To prepare for a potential incident, always keep your vet’s phone number handy, as well as an after-hours clinic you can call in case of an emergency. The ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center also has a helpline that you can call at (888) 426-4435 for advice.

Even with all of these resources, however, the best cure for food poisoning is to prevent it in the first place. To give you an idea of ​​what human foods can be dangerous, Stacker has put together a slideshow of 30 common foods to avoid. Take a look to see if there are any that surprise you.

Check out these 50 fascinating facts about dogs:

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We must revolutionize our relationship with animals or face our own extinction https://club-fuer-molosser.net/we-must-revolutionize-our-relationship-with-animals-or-face-our-own-extinction/ Fri, 11 Nov 2022 19:20:13 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/we-must-revolutionize-our-relationship-with-animals-or-face-our-own-extinction/ An excerpt from a report by the World Wide Fund for Nature published in October reads: “The world’s wild animal populations have fallen by an average of 69% since 1970. The staggering rate of decline is a stark warning that the rich biodiversity that sustains all life on our planet is in crisis, putting all […]]]>

An excerpt from a report by the World Wide Fund for Nature published in October reads: “The world’s wild animal populations have fallen by an average of 69% since 1970. The staggering rate of decline is a stark warning that the rich biodiversity that sustains all life on our planet is in crisis, putting all species at risk – including us.

This shocking statistic was released in time for the Cop27 summit currently taking place in Egypt. But that’s just one statistic, and like all statistics, no matter how alarming, they fail to capture hearts and minds or truly convey urgency.

Humanity’s use and exploitation of animals in various spheres of life is controversial. Humanity throughout history has developed complex relationships with other species inhabiting this world.

Some species he almost adopts as family members and attempts to anthropomorphize them (with varying degrees of success). Others he enslaves and uses as beasts of burden or uses them for entertainment. Others he incarcerates and slaughters for food.

An interesting interview on Radio 4’s PM program recently offered a graphic example of the confused relationship humans have with animals.

A poultry farmer, now forced to keep her large flock of free-range poultry inside sheds due to the bird flu epidemic, has explained, without the slightest irony, that she will have to provide mental stimulation to the hens as they are “just as smart and affectionate as dogs”, and she described how they recognize her, greet her and jump into her lap to be petted.

Free-range factory-fed hens are normally sent to slaughterhouses when their laying capacity declines, usually within a year of life – they rarely reach two. The normal lifespan of a hen is around 10 years, although it can reach 15 years.

I couldn’t help but wonder what the poultry farmer would think of sending his one-year-old dog to the slaughterhouse.

Those that do not fall into the categories of domestic, working or livestock animals are considered wild. But falling into the wild category does not guarantee freedom from human domination and destructive activities, far from it.

Another recent report worth noting is the United Nations Environment Program (UNEP) Emissions Gap Report, which states that there is now “no credible path 1.5°C in place” – the 2015 Paris Agreement said the world must stay within the 1.5°C global temperature rise to avoid catastrophic climate change and potential collapse vital ecosystems.

UN Secretary General Antonio Guterres said in his pre-Cop27 statement that instead of 1.5°C, the world is now heading for a calamitous 2.8°C temperature rise of here the end of the century, and in his keynote speech at Cop27 he gave the chilling warning: “We’re on a highway to hell with our foot still on the accelerator.”

The UNEP report identifies that humanity’s current food systems account for a third of global carbon emissions and states that human dietary changes are essential if we are to survive – and a substantial reduction in meat and dairy production is an imperative.

Raising animals for food already occupies more than a third of the Earth’s surface and uses up to a third of freshwater supplies, making it one of the world’s most energy-intensive industries. resources.

The animal agriculture industry has been identified as one of the main causes of air pollution, deforestation, species extinction and habitat loss and zoonotic diseases such as Covid – and that’s before even if we reach “dead zones” in the oceans.

With regard to the British countryside in particular, the first thing to note is that what we call the countryside is certainly not wilderness. Our countryside is a checkerboard landscape of uniform gridded areas used for growing crops – much of which is for animal feed to produce meat. Most of the rest is also pasture for the production of meat and dairy products.

All of Britain’s forests are heavily managed and mostly small, and the wildlife that inhabit them are carefully monitored, controlled and often culled if they appear to be breeding too successfully.

A new report from the Natural History Museum says there is little room left for nature in Britain. Therefore, the most bizarre human activity, given the completely depleted state of any remaining wilderness, has to be the hunting of wild animals.

Although the Hunting Act 2004 theoretically prohibits the hunting of most wild mammals (including foxes, deer, hares and mink) with dogs in England and Wales, there are clauses and gaps. For example, the law “does not cover the use of dogs in the process of flushing out an unidentified wild mammal, nor does it affect drag hunting, where dogs are trained to follow an artificial scent.” These clauses are fully taken advantage of by established hunters wishing to continue their “sporting” activities of terrorizing wildlife.

Every year the League Against Cruel Sports and other wildlife charities receive distressing reports from members of the public of suspected illegal hunting.

These reports are not only about wild animals being hunted and killed, but also about the chaos caused by hunts crossing private and public lands on horseback leading packs of dogs, using public roads and even railroads, dogs chasing and attacking farm animals. and even kill pets. Just last week, several dogs were hit by a train and killed.

This is where the Hunt Saboteurs Association comes in. The hunt saboteurs are the good guys trying to make sure no law is broken by the hunters as they step out decked in their traditional regalia astride their equine carriage surrounded by many malnourished dogs – who have of course were well informed of the restrictions imposed by the Hunting Act.

Saboteurs track and monitor hunts, photograph and film events, and, when appropriate, submit their evidence of law breaking to the police so that the laws can be enforced. Most saboteurs report that authorities are anything but supportive or grateful to them for fulfilling their civic duty.

Here in Cornwall, where I lived for 50 years, West Cornwall Hunt Saboteurs, along with Action Against Foxhunting Cornwall and Kernow Sabs, Monitors and Animal Rights Team, are an inspiring example of wildlife advocacy. Members give an inordinate amount of their free time to preserve and protect the few wild animals we are fortunate enough to still have.

It’s a thankless task, as sabs frequently suffer verbal and physical abuse and sometimes assault from the hunter fraternity and their followers. Yet many locals often cling to the “it’s a tradition” trope and believe in the deception conveyed by the hunts that it is the sabs who engage in illegal and aggressive actions.

The reach of the privileged elite can still have a hypnotic influence on the attitudes of rural populations. But that is changing. This year alone many pubs, particularly in Cornwall, have removed their welcome mats to chase away encounters, and they now advertise themselves as ‘places without bloodsport’.

As the Cop27 summit in Egypt continues to capture the world’s attention, here at home, perhaps we can do our part to help by supporting and encouraging the one small sector of humanity that gives all he has to protect and save the small fauna that we still have left – let’s listen to him for hunting saboteurs.

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A recipe for happiness | review review https://club-fuer-molosser.net/a-recipe-for-happiness-review-review/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/a-recipe-for-happiness-review-review/ Up close with Dr. E Whether I like it or not, I’m in the happiness business. Meet Mrs. B: “Dr. Elghammer, my daughter is sad and depressed. Her boyfriend got angry and hit her. His black eye has healed, but his heart is still throbbing in pain. Meet Mr. A: “I’m not sure I want […]]]>

Up close with Dr. E

Whether I like it or not, I’m in the happiness business.

Meet Mrs. B: “Dr. Elghammer, my daughter is sad and depressed. Her boyfriend got angry and hit her. His black eye has healed, but his heart is still throbbing in pain.

Meet Mr. A: “I’m not sure I want to live anymore. My wife has decided, after 21 years of marriage, that she is no longer in love with me.

Meet Cleo: “Five failed marriages. The first took me away from my violent father. The second took me away from the first. Numbers 3 and 4, well, the leopards don’t change places – both were abusive. The fifth was the real thing. I was in love with Marc Anthony. Beautiful, rich, powerful. But Marc only loved one thing, himself. What am I doing wrong in my relationships? »

Every working day, I see children, families, teenagers, couples — only on rare occasions do I have the joy of meeting cats and dogs, or turtles and mice; kids sometimes sneak into a pet… Sorry, where were we?

Although I would like to approach my craft as a carpenter – sketching the project, buying wood, sawing and building – my work requires the exhausting task of thinking. Why so much thought? Each patient I see is unique and the emotional wounds they carry are invisible. So, do you think it’s a good idea if I put in place a formula to help my patients find happiness? Ok I will try.

My mother taught me how to cook, and by the age of 12 I had mastered many culinary achievements. When I was 16, she gave me the book “The Joy of Cooking”. Using his teachings, I will give you “La Joie de Vivre”.

Recipe 1: Happiness

Happiness has four basic ingredients.

1. To be happy, you must first be alive. Pinch yourself. “Ouch” is proof that you are alive.

2. Awareness. If you are not aware of the gifts life has given you, you cannot be happy. Because outreach is such a tricky concept, I enlisted Cleo’s help (yes, you’ve met her before, five marriages ago).

3. Uncontaminated belief systems. Happiness is a seed capable of
growing, but only if planted in soil not contaminated with poison. Is your soil (your mind) free of poison (negative beliefs about yourself)? Do this to find out: Think of a close friend and examine how you treat them. Are you kind, generous and ready to help them? Now compare the way you treat your friend with the way you treat yourself. Are they equal? If not, you probably have negative beliefs such as “I’m too scared to allow anyone near me – they always leave or hurt me”.

4. Happiness is a by-product created by the relationships forged in life. Relationships come in many shapes and sizes: family, friendship, spiritual, natural. The deeper your relationships, the deeper your sense of well-being.

Cleo arrives in Chicago. “Now I would like to introduce you to Cleopatra, Queen of the Nile, who traveled from 40 BC in Egypt to 2012, Chicago’s Magnificent Mile, Bloomingdale’s Mall.” She is petite, pixie-like, 5-foot-2, with shiny raven hair, emerald eyes, and a striking body.

“Please call me Cleo. As you can see from my shopping bags, I love Chicago! But I’m curious. This movie I bought called “Cleopatra” has Richard Burton playing Marc Antony. Richard Burton is not my type. Also, this song I bought, “Walk Like an Egyptian”. Egyptians don’t walk like that, and what about all the mummy movies? »

“But let’s be serious. First, I am 16 years old. If I live to be 32, I’m considered old. However, you have a life expectancy of 85 years. You live 50 years longer than me. Isn’t it a gift? Second, my fastest horse goes 37 mph. Your planes are going at 2,000 mph. Third, if I break my leg or get sick, I could easily die. You can get new legs, new hearts, and medicine to heal yourself. Another gift.

A member of the crowd asked Cleo, “If you had all of our 21st century gifts, would that make you happy?” “No,” Cleo replied. “For me to be happy, I have to discover why I am unable to form deep relationships. Because without anyone to share my life with, I am alone and unsatisfied.

Conclusion: Cleopatra will eventually be diagnosed with a personality disorder, which destroyed her relationships. More to come on personality disorders next week.

The content of this article is for educational purposes only and should not be used as a substitute for professional treatment. The characters in this story are not real. Names and details have been changed to protect confidentiality.

Dr. Richard Elghammer contributes his weekly column to the Journal Review.

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Retro Review: Jared Diamond – Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies (Norton, 1997) https://club-fuer-molosser.net/retro-review-jared-diamond-guns-germs-and-steel-the-fates-of-human-societies-norton-1997/ Tue, 01 Nov 2022 19:24:51 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/retro-review-jared-diamond-guns-germs-and-steel-the-fates-of-human-societies-norton-1997/ In 1972, Jared Diamond was researching the evolution of birds in New Guinea. As he was walking along a beach, he had an hour-long conversation with a local politician named Yali, who asked him, “Why did you white people develop so much merchandise and did you bring to New Guinea, but we blacks had few […]]]>

In 1972, Jared Diamond was researching the evolution of birds in New Guinea. As he was walking along a beach, he had an hour-long conversation with a local politician named Yali, who asked him, “Why did you white people develop so much merchandise and did you bring to New Guinea, but we blacks had few goods? of ours? (page 14)

We’ve known for some time that the answer has nothing to do with race or genetics. So what is it? Diamond pondered the Yali question for more than two decades and tried to answer it with his now classic book. Guns, germs and steelwho turns 25e anniversary this year, and has been adapted into a PBS documentary series. Diamond’s answer is geography.

Guns, germs and steel make what might be the definitive case that this geography matters. In this regard, Diamond is compelling, but his singular focus rules out other things that matter as well. These include culture, institutions, psychology and political choices.

It is important to include these other factors because the Yali question, and its variants, are among the most important questions in the world. Humanity has made great strides in reducing poverty since around 1800. Since then, life expectancy has doubled and infant mortality has fallen by more than 90%. Average income increases about 30 times in rich countries, and many poor countries are catching up. Nothing like this has happened before in human history on a lasting basis.

Continuing this progress is the 21st decisive project of the century, in particular because there is still much to do.

When Yali and Diamond spoke in 1972, New Guinea’s GDP per capita was $294. That’s about 80 cents a day for the average person. In 2021, it was $2,916, or about $8 a day. That’s a 10-fold increase in what is now less than one life. Yet, there is still much to do. The average person in the United States earned about $190 a day in 2021, about 23 times more than the average New Guinean. How can New Guineans reach or exceed this level of prosperity?

In 2019, according to the most recent data available, more than 670 million people worldwide still live on $2.15 a day or less, which is the current extreme poverty line. This represents about 8.4% of the world’s population, the lowest ever. While COVID-era data will likely show a temporary setback when available, even a global pandemic is unlikely to change the fundamental trajectory of the past two centuries.

But that’s still 670 million people. About twice the population of the United States still lives without electricity, modern sanitation, education, decent medical care, and other things that even the poorest of the richest countries take for granted.

If we can understand what made rich countries rich, we can better understand how these 700 million people can get out of extreme poverty.

One thing that holds Diamond back from this project is that he seems at least as concerned with fighting inequality as he is with fighting poverty; they are different things. The fight against inequality is about mathematical ratios, while the fight against poverty is about improving the lot of people. One of them is ethically irrelevant, the other ethically primordial. But whether you prioritize ratios or people, Diamond shows that geography is an important part of both worldviews. You don’t need to share his ideological background to better understand the Yali issue.

If you look at a map of the world, one thing that immediately stands out is that the dominant axis of the Eurasian landmass runs horizontally from east to west. Both Africa and the Americas have a vertical North-South orientation. This, Diamond shows, is important in explaining why Europeans were the first to develop guns, germs and steel. Geography is the reason Europeans colonized Africa and the Americas, not the other way around.

Eurasia’s horizontal orientation means it has a massive temperate climate belt stretching about 9,000 miles from the Atlantic to the Pacific. This means that similar crops can grow over large areas. When people figured out how to domesticate a few high-calorie temperate zone crops like wheat and legumes, they were able to spread widely.

This was not possible in Africa, the Americas or Oceania. Many parts of these regions lack temperate zones and depend on less nutritious tropical crops, such as plantains or yams. The Great Temperate Belt of North America grew mainly corn before Columbus, which is less nutritious than Eurasian crops. Corn-centric diets make people vulnerable to pellagra if they don’t get nutrients like niacin and tryptophan from other food sources.

Eurasia’s east-west temperate belt is also good economic luck, and not just gastronomically. This facilitates the construction of commercial networks. This is one of the reasons why there was no vertical American or African equivalent to the horizontal Silk Road that linked Asian and European traders in the temperate zones.

Easy calories and easy trade allowed the development of villages, then of cities. These population centers allowed for specialization and trade, which led to better technology over time. Geography gave the Eurasian civilizations a technological head start in developing the guns and Diamond title steel they needed to colonize the rest of the world.

Geography also has to do with germs. Again, this is more down to luck than anything else; most domestic wild animals were found on the Eurasian landmass. Our most common pets have Eurasian origins, including horses, pigs, cows, cats, and dogs. Native American civilizations did not domesticate any large species apart from llamas and alpacas, which are not strong enough to carry heavy loads or drive plows like camels, oxen, or horses. While wild Eurasian horses and pigs are domesticated, their African relatives, such as zebras and warthogs, are not.

This matters for diseases because, as many people have learned during the COVID-19 pandemic, some diseases can jump from species to species. When people welcomed animals into their homes and villages, they also welcomed their diseases, some of which were zoonotic. This appears in the very name of certain diseases like chickenpox and cowpox.

The early rates of illness and death from animal domestication must have been brutal, especially without a germ theory to explain why it was happening. But over time, human versions of diseases like influenza, malaria, and smallpox have become rampant and (usually) non-lethal. High mortality from disease was part of the price of sedentary life, but survivors developed substantial immunities.

Thousands of years later, when the Old World met the New World with its guns and steel, the Eurasian sprouts arrived. It didn’t matter much to Europeans and their built-up immunities, but it mattered a lot to Native Americans who had never been exposed to European diseases. Up to 90 percent of some native populations perished from disease in the first generations after contact.

According to Diamond, this is how geography can explain why guns, germs and steel appeared when and where they did, and why the Eurasian civilizations were the colonizers and not the colonized. It’s a compelling story and an important part of the answer to Yali’s question.

But that’s not the whole answer. The disadvantage of Guns, germs and steel is that it is, at heart, a single-variable answer to a multivariate question. It remains essential reading 25 years after its publication, especially for those who believe that good economic policies are the only variable that can answer Yali’s question. But because of Guns, germs and steelreaders interested in helping to fight global poverty should consider Diamond as only part of the answer.

A good place to turn for a more holistic approach is the short, readable text by Mark Koyama and Jared Rubin. How the World Got Rich: The Historical Origins of Economic Growth, which shows how all the important growth engines work together. In addition to geography, they answer the Yali question with cultural attitudes toward openness, progress, and trade; political and social institutions; population growth; and relatively market-oriented economic policies. None of these things have enriched the world. All have interacted – and the process is still ongoing.

They also argue that colonialism and slavery have impoverished the world. The old model of wealth through exploitation is proving to be a failure. Colonialism certainly enriched individual monarchs and East India Company stockholders, but it was also costly vanity schemes that impoverished societies as a whole. Empires use more military and economic resources than they produce, as Adam Smith and several Americans pointed out in 1776, and as the Spaniards and Dutch discovered the hard way a century before Smith.

Diamond’s other analytical flaws are his determinism, his Malthusianism, and his over-emphasis on this old empirical economic exploitation. It is significant that the subtitle of Guns, germs and steel is the deterministic sound The destinies of human societiesand that its follow-up volumes are the climate and population themes of 2011 Collapseand 2019 Upheavalwhich focuses on how societies can recover from future crises.

A good antidote to Diamond’s pessimism is that of Marian Tupy and Gale Pooley Overabundance: the story of population growth, innovation and human flourishing on an infinitely generous planet. Tupy and Poole show the astonishing magnitude of the modern wealth explosion. Like Koyama and Rubin, they offer multicausal insight into its origins. They also offer insight into why many people, including Diamond, tend to be pessimistic about the future, despite overwhelming evidence to the contrary.

Geography matters, but it is no longer destiny. As Julian Simon pointed out, the human mind is the ultimate resource. He learned to cross oceans, fly over mountains, desalinate ocean water, stay cool in summer and warm in winter, and connect global trade networks. There are only a limited number of atoms in the world, but there are almost endless ways to arrange them. While Diamond is right that the orientation of the continents matters more than most people realize, we’ve also reached a point in history where other things matter far more.

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“He turned it into a dinner bell” https://club-fuer-molosser.net/he-turned-it-into-a-dinner-bell/ Sun, 30 Oct 2022 12:27:41 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/he-turned-it-into-a-dinner-bell/ A shy, elderly donkey has delighted its owner by showing off its singing voice just days after setting foot in its foster home. Today, nothing but center stage will suffice for this king of drama. Pinky Ruggles, 37, lives in Conroe, Texas, in a house with land. She’s always dreamed of owning horses, and after […]]]>

A shy, elderly donkey has delighted its owner by showing off its singing voice just days after setting foot in its foster home. Today, nothing but center stage will suffice for this king of drama.

Pinky Ruggles, 37, lives in Conroe, Texas, in a house with land. She’s always dreamed of owning horses, and after buying her first horse, Ace, in 2009, she noticed he had an affinity for donkeys. She also had Jack, another horse, in 2018.

When Pinky closed on a new home and finally had more space, she contacted the Texas Miracle Ranch (TMR) in Plantersville, telling them she would like to adopt a tougher donkey.

(Courtesy of Pinky Ruggles)

The ranch introduced him to two “super sweet” donkeys before he met Monte. The average lifespan of a donkey is between 27 and 40 years. At the time, Pinky had no idea Monte was already 26. He just seemed “perfect”.

“He was standing by himself on the side, quiet, shuffling,” Pinky told The Epoch Times. “There was just something about him that said, ‘You gotta pick this little dude.

“I came home and said to my boyfriend, ‘I think I’ve found the perfect ass for Ace.’ When it was time for him to come home in September 2020, this donkey got off the trailer and… looked like he was ready for a new life.

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Pinky Ruggles)
Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Pinky Ruggles)

Monte was also ready to meet his two new friends, Ace, now 15, and Jack, now 16. The trio bonded instantly. Pinky kept them on halters for safety, but in no time the horses and their new donkey pal were grazing together in the backyard. Monte was only silent in his new home for a few days before he found his voice.

“I think I heard it maybe once or twice,” Pinky said, “but on the third day for breakfast I went out the back to feed them at their stalls, as I usually do, and he just let go.

“He looked like he was surprised when he did it, and I know the horses were like, ‘What was that? But now he’s turned it into a dinner bell, as soon as it starts braying the horses know that means mommy’s out and mommy’s got food!

Monte doesn’t just sing for his supper. The musical mule also brays at mini ponies across the street, cars pulling up in the driveway, and neighborhood roosters. But standing in front of the stairs, braying and nodding until Pinky appears, is by far his favorite pastime.

(Courtesy of Pinky Ruggles)

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Pinky Ruggles)

“I thought to myself, ‘Well, he sings! Obviously he’s an opera singer, we have to put him online,’ said Pinky, who didn’t expect his eccentric ass goes viral.

Since her meteoric success on TikTok and Instagram, Monte has even become “a bit of a diva” and has understood that when the camera comes out, the snacks follow.

“People let me know daily how much joy he brings them,” Pinky said. “Whether it’s someone who’s never really interacted with a donkey before, doesn’t have the space for a donkey, or just wants to keep up with a super clumsy animal, we’re humble.”

Pinky says she has no way of knowing what Monte went through before being rescued by TMR ten years ago. He can still be “a little aloof”, but once he gets comfortable, he loves scratches, is very smart, very mischievous, loves life, and loves food even more.

“Her love language is food,” Pinky said.

Epoch Times Photo
(Courtesy of Pinky Ruggles)

When Monte is with Pinky, his most trusted caregiver, he will hunt, play and act awkwardly. The bond they share is extraordinary. “It’s a trust,” Pinky explained. “I know he’s not going to do anything to hurt me, and he also knows that I’m not going to hurt him.”

Monte and Ace stay close. Older now, Ace has stepped down from his old role as troublemaker, but Pinky still describes the noisy bond of horse and donkey as “a mess.” It also forms two parts of a love triangle: while the alpha horse, Jack, is possessive of Ace, Monte competes for Ace’s attention, leaving the bullied horse in the middle.

“It cracks me up,” said Pinky, who posts articles about living with her animals, helpful resources and fan art-inspired Monte products on her website, montethesingdonkey.com.

“I have my horses and the donkey in the garden, the dogs in the house and now the chickens. Why not share it, because I love it so much!

Share your stories with us at emg.inspired@epochtimes.com, and keep getting your daily dose of inspiration by signing up for the Inspired newsletter at TheEpochTimes.com/newsletter

Louise Rooms

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Louise Chambers is a writer born and raised in London, England. She covers inspirational news and human interest stories.

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Keeping Our Pets at a Healthy and Happy Weight – Hometown Focus https://club-fuer-molosser.net/keeping-our-pets-at-a-healthy-and-happy-weight-hometown-focus/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 08:01:39 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/keeping-our-pets-at-a-healthy-and-happy-weight-hometown-focus/ happy scary Season! This month, I want to tackle a scary topic: obesity in pets. National Pet Obesity Awareness Day is this month and while a chonky pet may look cute, it’s important to consider and understand the frightening consequences of our pets carrying more weight than they should. Healthy weight can vary for a […]]]>

happy scary

Season! This month, I want to tackle a scary topic: obesity in pets. National Pet Obesity Awareness Day is this month and while a chonky pet may look cute, it’s important to consider and understand the frightening consequences of our pets carrying more weight than they should.

Healthy weight can vary for a variety of reasons among individuals, so we use a body condition score to help consider shape, breed and size to better judge if an animal is in good condition and has a healthy weight.

The main things we consider when assessing pet body condition are size and abdomen, ability to feel ribs/spine/hip bones, and fat deposits. A dog or cat in ideal physical condition would have ribs, spine, and hip bones that are easily felt (and possibly visible depending on the coat) with no excess fatty tissue, as well as a size visible from above and neatly folded back when viewed from the side.

In a 2018 study on the prevention of obesity in pets, 59.5% of cats and 55.8% of dogs were overweight or obese, more than half of our pet population considered overweight or obese.

Pet obesity is considered a disease by most veterinarians and pet owners, and it is clear that it has become endemic in our pet population. Although those few extra pounds may seem harmless, they can shorten your life.

A study published in the Journal of Veterinary Internal Medicine showed that healthy-weight dogs lived an average of two and a half years longer than their overweight counterparts. Being overweight can adversely affect our pet’s health and lead to various health problems including arthritis, heart disease and hypertension, diabetes mellitus and cancer, to name a few.

What can we do with so many stacked against us? The first thing to do is to determine if your pet has a good body condition score. Speak to your veterinarian and always consider any health issues and concerns when developing a plan to address your pet’s weight and body condition. If your pet needs to lose weight, a good goal is usually 0.5-2% of their body weight per month, depending on their size.

Regular exercise is important for weight maintenance, but also for the general health and well-being of pets. Dogs generally need at least 30 minutes of activity a day, but this can vary greatly depending on your dog’s breed and health status.

Find exercises that are enjoyable for you and your pet. Walking, swimming, or playing with their favorite toy are great ways to get your pet moving and spending time bonding.

Cats need an average of three five-minute play periods per day. You may need to get creative to encourage your cat to exercise. Toys can be elaborate or simple as long as they are safe to entertain.

In my experience, cats tend to prefer cheaper options like cardboard boxes over the expensive, well-researched toys I buy for them. Hiding or throwing treats around the house can provide exercise and boost your cat’s natural hunting abilities.

Consider your pet’s lifestyle, health needs, and tastes when choosing a diet. Many of your favorite pet food brands, whether traditional kibble or fresh food, offer “healthy weight” varieties created with pets prone to overweight in mind, which can be a good starting point.

In general, canned pet foods tend to be lower in carbs while still being a delicious (in most pets’ opinion) option. Ask your veterinarian for the recommended daily calorie intake for your pet – 90% of this should be diet and 10% can come from treats and fillings. You can then use these numbers to calculate exactly how much food you should be feeding based on the calorie content of the diet you choose.

Try to be consistent as much as possible and use an appropriate measuring cup or kitchen scale. Pre-dosing food and treats for the day can be helpful, especially if you have multiple people at home offering food and treats – we’ve all been there when those puppy eyes or incessant meows have prompted us. to feed them what turns out to be a second breakfast.

Keeping your pets at a healthy weight is the best thing you can do for their health and longevity. Although obesity in pets can be a scary topic, there are many easy changes you can make at home to improve your pet’s quality of life for years to come. Wishing you and your pets a happy spooky season and remember to enjoy all your tricks and treats in moderation!

Resources:

• www.petobesityprevention.
org
• www.onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/full/10.1111/
jvim.15367

Dr. Molly Feiro, veterinarian and owner of Iron Pine Veterinary Services, grew up in Hibbing. She earned her bachelor’s degree in animal science at the University of Minnesota, then attended veterinary school at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. She has been practicing small animal medicine on the Iron Chain for five years and opened her own mobile clinic in August 2021. She can be reached at 218-780-8049.

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Tulsa’s Oktoberfest evokes the atmosphere of the Munich original https://club-fuer-molosser.net/tulsas-oktoberfest-evokes-the-atmosphere-of-the-munich-original/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 03:00:00 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/tulsas-oktoberfest-evokes-the-atmosphere-of-the-munich-original/ Tonja Carrigg made several trips to Munich, Germany to experience the original Oktoberfest. “It’s truly been a phenomenal experience,” said Carrigg, who serves as director of Tulsa’s Oktoberfest in addition to her duties as director of community relations for Tulsa’s River Parks Authority. “And that’s our inspiration for the Tulsa festival. Every year we try […]]]>

Tonja Carrigg made several trips to Munich, Germany to experience the original Oktoberfest.

“It’s truly been a phenomenal experience,” said Carrigg, who serves as director of Tulsa’s Oktoberfest in addition to her duties as director of community relations for Tulsa’s River Parks Authority. “And that’s our inspiration for the Tulsa festival. Every year we try to add more things that make our festival more authentic, more like the one held in Munich.”

The 2022 festival, which officially opens Thursday, Oct. 20 at River West Festival Park, 2100 S. Jackson Ave., marks the 43rd year of this celebration of Bavarian food, drink and conviviality. While still far from questioning the longevity of Munich’s original, which dates back to the early 1800s, Tulsa’s Oktoberfest has consistently been hailed as one of the best such festivals in the country.

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Although Thursday is the official first day of the 2022 festival, activities began on Tuesday, with the Abend im Festzelt – better known as Biermeister’s Ball, a paid private event – ​​and continues on Wednesday with Gemütlichkeit, which is the main Oktoberfest fundraising event.

Oktoberfest will begin with the traditional Ein Abend mit Freunden und Familie, or evening of friends and family, from 5 p.m. on Thursday, October 20. Evening activities include the parade of brewers, tapping of the ceremonial first barrel, and fireworks over the Arkansas River.

Carrigg said one of the new features for 2022 will be the ability to reserve a table for up to 10 guests for the entire evening of the festival’s opening night, Thursday, October 20. The cost is $400, or $40 per person.

“One of the hallmarks of the Munich event is the sense of community that is created when people come together,” she said.

Also new for the 2022 Tulsa event are a number of wooden structures designed to recall cabins and similar buildings one might encounter on a visit to Bavaria.

“We’ve had these structures on our radar for some time, and after the success of last year’s festival, we were able to add them,” Carrigg said. “They will replace some of the tents and cabins we have used in the past, and they will be very decorated, to add to the experience of really feeling in Germany.”

This year will also bring the flavors of Bavaria to the banks of what remains of the Arkansas River in a literal way, with the first-time participation of the Weihenstephan Brewery, a Munich-based operation that claims to be the oldest operating brewery in the world. world.

Originally a project of the residents of a Benedictine monastery, the Weihenstephan Brewery has survived fires, plagues, wars and other calamities in its nearly 1,000 year history. The brewery will be offering five of its signature beers in its dedicated beer tent, or zelt, during the festival. In total, there will be a dozen of these zelts at this year’s festival featuring local, national and international breweries, serving over 100 different beers.

Festival-goers can enjoy these libations using a MassKrug, a one-liter (33.8-ounce) cup that resembles the iconic serving vessels of Munich’s Oktoberfest. A less ostentatious model, the 16-ounce KleinKrug, is also available.

While most of the things added to this year’s Oktoberfest are designed to evoke the Old World, this year’s festival will also feature the beginnings of something that is strictly Tulsa.

“One of the most popular events is our Dachshund Dash, which we’ve been doing for about 10 years now,” Carrigg said, referring to the annual spirit featuring a group of local badger dogs (which is the literal translation from the word dachshund).

“It’s something everyone loves, because there’s just something about a dachshund that makes you smile,” she said. “We already have our Bier Meister and Chicken mascots, so we decided to add a new mascot, which is Dash the Dachshund.”

Last year, the festival inaugurated a gastronomic component with its Restaurant am Himmel, or Restaurant in the Sky. It returns this year, offering a three-course Bavarian meal with beer and wine pairings, prepared by Chef Josh Vitt of Vitter’s Catering.

Restaurant am Himmel will offer one seat on Thursday, October 20 at 6:30 p.m. Two seats will be available at 5:30 and 7:30 p.m. on Friday and Saturday, October 22 and 22. The cost is $70 adults, $45 children.

Nearly 30 food vendors will be on hand, offering everything from authentic German sausages and schnitzels to carnival dishes such as corn dogs and funnel cakes.

The festival will also include entertainment by some 40 artists, including two German bands – AlpenFetzer and Dorfrocker – as well as familiar Oktoberfest performers such as accordionist Alex Meixner, Das ist Lustig and the Chardon Polka Band.

Costumed dancers, musicians and comedians perform hourly at Das Glockenspiel, and Der KinderPlatz will offer a variety of entertainment, crafts and games for younger guests.

As Tulsa Oktoberfest fills more than a weekend with activity, Carrigg said there’s a Munich tradition she hopes can bring to Tulsa.

“One of the mainstays of the Munich festival is that on the first day they have a parade through the city center of participating brewers and others who represent aspects of German culture,” she said. “It’s one of the events I’ve never missed.

“We have our parade on the festival grounds, and it’s a lot of fun,” Carrigg said, “but I would love to evolve into a full-scale parade from downtown Tulsa to the festival site. It would be a way of emphasizing that this festival is about community, which is why we’re in our 43rd year – because the Tulsa community participates in this festival at every level.

What the Ale, beer of the week: Cabin Boys Brewery’s Goin’ Stag

Austin McIlroy describes his winning teams at the Great American Beer Festival for Goin’ Stag a Belgian Single



james.watts@tulsaworld.com

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Short-lived dogs 2022: Here are the 10 adorable dog breeds that live the shortest lives on average – including the gorgeous Bernese Mountain Dog 🐕 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/short-lived-dogs-2022-here-are-the-10-adorable-dog-breeds-that-live-the-shortest-lives-on-average-including-the-gorgeous-bernese-mountain-dog-%f0%9f%90%95/ Fri, 14 Oct 2022 02:36:30 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/short-lived-dogs-2022-here-are-the-10-adorable-dog-breeds-that-live-the-shortest-lives-on-average-including-the-gorgeous-bernese-mountain-dog-%f0%9f%90%95/ Over the past two years, many of us have welcomed a new four-legged friend into our homes, as the Kennel Club has seen dog ownership increase by almost 8% during the global pandemic. But with 221 different purebred dog breeds to choose from, there’s a lot of thought to go into selecting your perfect pup, […]]]>

Over the past two years, many of us have welcomed a new four-legged friend into our homes, as the Kennel Club has seen dog ownership increase by almost 8% during the global pandemic.

But with 221 different purebred dog breeds to choose from, there’s a lot of thought to go into selecting your perfect pup, whether you want a big dog, a family dog, or a crossbreed.

One of the terrible truths of dog ownership is that we’ll likely outlive our beloved pet, with the average dog only living to be 10-13 years old – but there’s a pretty big gap between breeds that live the life. the longest and the shortest.

The Chihuahua, for example, can expect to live between 15 and 20 years, while some larger dogs will last less than half as long.

Here are the 10 breeds that have the shortest average lifespan.

For all the latest dog news, photos, tips and information, join our Scotsdog Facebook group here

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