dogs foundation fund – Club Fuer Molosser http://club-fuer-molosser.net/ Sat, 25 Jun 2022 03:29:53 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-88.png dogs foundation fund – Club Fuer Molosser http://club-fuer-molosser.net/ 32 32 SCOTUS rules Medicare dispute in favor of HHS https://club-fuer-molosser.net/scotus-rules-medicare-dispute-in-favor-of-hhs/ Fri, 24 Jun 2022 16:13:00 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/scotus-rules-medicare-dispute-in-favor-of-hhs/ Associate Justice Elena Kagan Despite the rather frosty reception, judges gave the Biden administration’s Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) SCOTUS at hearings one-sided 5-4 with the federal agency on Friday. The Supreme Court ruling means HHS can continue to use its preferred method of calculating payments for hospitals that admit a disproportionate number […]]]>

Associate Justice Elena Kagan

Despite the rather frosty reception, judges gave the Biden administration’s Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) SCOTUS at hearings one-sided 5-4 with the federal agency on Friday. The Supreme Court ruling means HHS can continue to use its preferred method of calculating payments for hospitals that admit a disproportionate number of low-income patients.

Becerra v Empire Health Foundationbrought before the Supreme Court by the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit is a case about what formula HHS should use to calculate federal Medicare payments to certain hospitals, known as “DSH hospitals.” DSH—or “disproportionate hospitals”—are those that serve a high percentage of low-income patients. These facilities receive additional Medicare funding to account for the increased costs associated with low-income patients.

However, it is questionable how much additional funding the DSH hospitals are entitled to. The amount is calculated based on a complex formula set out in the Medicare statute. There is significant disagreement over how to perform the calculation using this formula, not only between hospitals and the federal government, but also among members of the Supreme Court.

The Empire Health Foundation sued, arguing that HHS’ calculations intentionally deprived DSH hospitals of over $600 million, thereby circumventing Congress’ legislative intent. In a narrow judgment, the Supreme Court opposed Empire, finding that HHS’s calculations had been correct all along.

justice Elena Kagan wrote the majority decision for SCOTUS. In it, Kagan went to great lengths to explain the DSH formula to the readers. After detailing the DSH “surcharge” using both the “Medicare portion” and the “Medicaid portion,” Kagan told readers, “With that, you may be ready to absorb the relevant legal language (but don’t). You can bet on that).” Throughout the statement, Kagan frequently referred to the complexity of the formula, echoing Justice Clarence Thomas’ Statements during oral hearings that described the law as “indecipherable.”

Always the professor, Kagan walked readers through the HHS interpretation of these fractions before summarizing:

So again, in general terms, the numerator is the number of patient days attributable to poor non-Medicare patients. The denominator is the total number of patient days. Divide the former by the latter to get the second percentage needed for the DSH calculation.

Next, Kagan explained the real-world application of these calculations. Some patients are excluded from part of the applicable formula because they are justified for Medicare coverage (even if Medicare is not actually pay for their treatment). In most cases, the exclusion of these patients from the formula results in a reduction in DSH payments.

The Supreme Court ruled that HHS is doing the calculations correctly, no matter how confusing the process might be.

“The text and context support the agency’s reading,” Kagan said, noting that HHS’s interpretation of this calculation is consistent with definitions “throughout the Medicare statute.”

In contrast, Kagan said, Empire’s proposed formula just doesn’t make sense. Empire’s interpretation of the Statute would mean that the terms “eligible” and “eligible” are equivalent. The Supreme Court was not convinced, and Kagan wrote, “But that reading, while abstractly plausible, does not work in the Medicare statute.”

Kagan also addressed the practical implications of siding with the Empire:

Consider what that might mean in the real world: A Medicare patient who was hospitalized for more than 90 days—a very sick person by definition—couldn’t enroll in Part D prescription drug coverage. Congress could not have wanted – and in fact could not have envisaged – this outcome.

The majority found Empire Health’s interpretation problematic on several counts, arguing that Empire’s interpretation of the Act would render other provisions of the Health Act “impervious or unthinkable or both.”

While the majority of their decision was largely limited to the principles of interpreting the law, the impact on the DSH hospitals did not go unnoticed by the court. “The Empire’s only answer [to the many arguments in HHS’s favor] is to insist that his interpretation must be correct, as this usually (but not always) leads to higher DSH payments for hospitals.” This line of thinking is wrong, said the majority.

Kagan elaborated and wrote that “the purpose of the DSH regulations is not to pay the hospitals as much money as possible; Instead, hospitals should be compensated for caring for a disproportionate proportion of low-income patients.”

“And Empire’s reading excels only in the former, not the latter,” she added.

justice Brett Kavanaugh drafted a dissent which was endorsed by the Chief Justice John Robertsas well as judges Samuel Alito and Neil Gorsuch. Kavanaugh refused to agree with the majority’s repeated assessment that the disputed legal formula was highly complex. Rather, he called the formula “relatively straightforward” and said Empire Health’s position was backed by “traditional insurance and benefits coordination principles.”

Kavanaugh noted that HHS has used different interpretations over the years.

“Importantly, from the enactment of the law in 1986 through 2003, HHS interpreted this statute exactly as I did,” the judge wrote.

He continued, pointing his finger directly at HHS for manipulating the numbers to save money:

Then, in 2004, HHS abruptly changed course. Why? Probably to save money. HHS has been struggling to find ways to contain Medicare costs in the face of rising Medicare spending and the country’s budgetary situation. To that end, HHS’s new interpretation of this statute in 2004 had the downstream effect of significantly reducing reimbursements from HHS to hospitals serving low-income patients.

The correct interpretation of the statute, Kavanaugh said, is not to side with any of the “dog breakfasts of arguments about broad legal purposes” offered by the parties. Rather, he wrote, “This case is resolved by the most fundamental principle of interpreting the law: read the law.”

On Kavanaugh’s reading, none “pay attention” to the majority conclusion:

In summary: A patient was not entitled to payment from Medicare “for such days” in the hospital if the patient could not (and therefore did not have) receive payment from Medicare for those days – for example because privately. the patient’s health insurance already covered the patient’s care, or the patient had exhausted their Medicare benefits. Both the legal text and common sense point to this conclusion. HHS’s interpretation to the contrary amounts to asserting that a patient may be both eligible and expendable to be paid by Medicare for a particular day of hospitalization. This interpretation doesn’t work. And HHS’ misinterpretation of the law has significant real-world implications: It financially hurts hospitals that serve low-income patients, thereby hampering those hospitals’ ability to provide needed care to low-income communities.

Although Gorsuch echoed Kavanaugh’s dissent, he was noticeably silent on the case. Gorsuch has long been a critic of “chevron deference,” the principle of submitting to an administrative authority’s interpretation of complex industry-specific legislation. Kavanaugh confined his disagreement to the correct interpretation of the statute applicable to DSH hospitals and did not comment generally on Chevron’s deference.

During the hearing, Gorsuch noted that courts tend to consider the interests of the parties in contract disputes and questioned whether it would be fair to rely on HHS’s own interpretation if it had a financial interest in the outcome of the litigation. Interestingly, neither Gorsuch nor his comrades-in-arms took up this argument in the four-way dissent.

[Photo by Erin Schaff-Pool/Getty Images]

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Computer chip subsidy bill to pass in Congress https://club-fuer-molosser.net/computer-chip-subsidy-bill-to-pass-in-congress/ Wed, 22 Jun 2022 18:04:26 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/computer-chip-subsidy-bill-to-pass-in-congress/ Placeholder when loading item promotions When the Senate passed a rare $52 billion bipartisan measure to subsidize computer chip manufacturing and research in the United States last summer, it seemed like an easy legislative priority for both parties. Chips were so scarce that car factories shut down for weeks, threatening jobs and driving up prices. […]]]>
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When the Senate passed a rare $52 billion bipartisan measure to subsidize computer chip manufacturing and research in the United States last summer, it seemed like an easy legislative priority for both parties.

Chips were so scarce that car factories shut down for weeks, threatening jobs and driving up prices. New cars became so rare that used cars skyrocketed in price, often exceeding what they cost when new. Manufacturers of seemingly everything, from products as diverse as smartphones and dog wash stalls, complained that they couldn’t get the chips they needed. The White House called several emergency meetings, and Republicans and Democrats quickly rallied.

But a year later, the funding is still not signed into law. Parliament took until February to approve the subsidies. Since then, the process of bringing together House and Senate bills has stalled over disputes over non-chip elements of the legislation, including climate regulations and trade with China. Myriad other issues, including military aid to Ukraine and gas price inflation, have also distracted lawmakers.

Proponents of chip funding say they are now trying to salvage it before Congress goes into its August recess, after which the election season is likely to stifle prospects for big new legislation.

Used car market in chaos as prices soar

House and Senate leaders met Tuesday to try to negotiate a deal. They didn’t come out with an agreement on what to include in the final bill, but they did agree they must act quickly to prevent chipmakers from bypassing the United States and investing abroad, according to one with the talks trusted person who spoke on condition of anonymity to discuss sensitive negotiations.

“We have expressed our belief that there is no reason not to pass this legislation through Congress in July,” said House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-Calif.) and Senate Majority Leader Charles E .Schumer (DN.Y.). statement afterwards. “Democrats have already made arrangements to reach an agreement that we are optimistic can happen soon.” The Republican leadership did not immediately comment.

The problems that triggered the legislation in the first place are still pressing. A global shortage of computer chips continues to slow production in the US and other developed countries and drive up the prices of cars and other electronic goods.

Limited chip supply will continue to constrain car manufacturing into 2024 as vehicle demand pents up and the popularity of electric cars, which require more chips per vehicle, increases, consulting firm AlixPartners said on Wednesday.

House Democrats are eager to pass the bill because many members, including the most vulnerable swing district officials, believe it would help them argue that the party is tackling inflation and supply chain problems that are affecting the economy drive them.

US government subsidies would never provide a quick fix to the world’s chip deficit. Building a chip factory takes years. As chips, also known as semiconductors, have become an essential part of so much modern technology, many technology companies and lawmakers have argued that ensuring greater domestic production is a matter of economic and national security.

“Anything that has an on/off switch relies on a semiconductor chip,” Sen. Mark R. Warner (D-Va.), a leading supporter of the subsidy, said in an interview. “As we see now, with the shortage of these chips holding back the auto industry, the lack of a secure domestic supply chain will only exacerbate this problem as we move to more and more connected devices.”

The main reason for the shortage is that too few companies are willing to invest the $10 billion or more required to build a semiconductor fab. Countries around the world have thrown subsidies at these chipmakers in hopes of enticing them to locate new facilities within their borders.

Some of those programs could outperform the United States, Warner said. “A year ago, Europeans didn’t have a semiconductor subsidy program,” but Germany is now introducing subsidies for an Intel manufacturing facility, he said.

“If the German bureaucracy moves faster than the American legislative process, that’s not a good sign,” Warner said.

Intel announced plans in March to invest $20 billion in two chip fabs in Ohio, promising to start construction later this year and finish by the end of 2025. although some have said the speed of their investments will depend on the passage of the subsidy.

“The CHIPS Act makes the US semiconductor industry more competitive worldwide. For GlobalFoundries, the passage of the CHIPS funding would affect the speed and pace at which we invest in expanding our U.S. manufacturing capacity,” Steven Grasso, GlobalFoundries’ managing director of global government affairs, said in an email, referencing referring to the company’s plans for expansion into a location in Malta, NY, where initial approvals are pending.

In both the Senate and House of Representatives, funding is in broader bills aimed at boosting US economic competitiveness in the face of growing competition from China and other nations. Lawmakers say there is strong support in both houses for semiconductor subsidies and for increased spending on the National Science Foundation and other research efforts, but agreement on other policies is breaking down.

in the a letter Last week, the CEOs of more than 100 technology companies, including Microsoft, IBM and Google’s parent company Alphabet, urged Senate and House leaders to pass the bill, calling semiconductor funding and other manufacturing and research policies “vital to ours entire economy.”

“The rest of the world is not waiting for the US to act. Our global competitors are investing in their industries, their workers and their economies, and it is imperative that Congress act to improve US competitiveness,” they wrote in the letter Semiconductor Industry Association organized.

Manufacturers have some computer chips for less than five days, the Commerce Department says

Congressional aides said it’s likely the final bill will be more similar to Senate legislation because it passed with bipartisan support, while the House bill had only one Republican supporter, Rep. Adam Kinzinger (Ill.).

House Democrats had to make concessions on the trade and climate provisions they included in their bill along the way, said the person familiar with Tuesday’s congressional leadership meeting.

The expansion of the House of Representatives Trade Adjustment Assistance Programhelping workers who lose their jobs as a result of offshoring and other adverse effects of foreign trade is a particular non-starter for Republicans, congressional aides say.

Another provision sparking debate would require the federal government to review and temporarily ban certain US investments in China. The measure, proposed by Sens. Robert P. Casey Jr. (D-Pa.) and John Cornyn (R-Tex.), has some bipartisan support in both chambers, but was still “one of the more contentious issues to reach an agreement.” on,” said Stephen Ezell, vice president for global innovation policy at the Information Technology and Innovation Foundation.

Todd Tucker, director of industrial policy and trade at the Roosevelt Institute think tank, said the House bill included important provisions to protect U.S. supply chains from external shocks like the pandemic, which led to widespread shortages of medical supplies.

Among other things, the bill would create a $500 million Manufacturing Safety and Resilience Office at the Department of Commerce tasked with tracking real-time availability of goods and services and critical manufacturing in the United States and allied nations further, Tucker said.

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UCF star Daunte Culpepper becomes ‘greatest cheerleader’ https://club-fuer-molosser.net/ucf-star-daunte-culpepper-becomes-greatest-cheerleader/ Sat, 18 Jun 2022 21:27:24 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/ucf-star-daunte-culpepper-becomes-greatest-cheerleader/ As Daunte Culpepper walked through the lobby of the Celeste Hotel on Friday night, he was greeted by enthusiastic UCF supporters waiting for an autograph, posing for a selfie or just wanting to shake his hand. At 6ft 4, Culpepper stands out as a gentle giant who pauses to share his time. “Orlando has always […]]]>

As Daunte Culpepper walked through the lobby of the Celeste Hotel on Friday night, he was greeted by enthusiastic UCF supporters waiting for an autograph, posing for a selfie or just wanting to shake his hand.

At 6ft 4, Culpepper stands out as a gentle giant who pauses to share his time.

“Orlando has always been great to me and UCF has always been great to me,” Culpepper said. “I’m honored and happy to be here.”

It’s been more than two decades since Culpepper burst onto the college football scene and displayed exceptional athleticism for a quarterback. He grew into his role and showed the composure and leadership needed when the Knights transitioned to a Division IA football program in 1996.

Culpepper had a record-breaking All-American career and finished sixth in the 1998 Heisman Trophy voting. He became the first UCF player to be selected in the first round of the NFL draft when he was drafted by No. 11 Minnesota and spent 11 seasons with the Vikings, Miami Dolphins, Oakland Raiders and Detroit Lions.

But over the years, Culpepper has been just as adept at avoiding the limelight as he was at avoiding defenders.

“I’ve been here a lot more times than people think, just never on camera,” Culpepper explained. “I usually come to one game a year. I never get interviewed because I’m not on the sidelines. I’ll be here, and I’ll probably be here more times than I have.

“I’ve always been proud of this program, sometimes remotely. I’ve always been a big supporter no matter where I’ve been. I’m just so grateful and proud of the progress UCF has made and glad to have been a part of it.”

When former UCF quarterback McKenzie Milton reached out a few months ago about attending an event for Mission Control, a collective that provides UCF athletes with opportunities for name, image and likeness, Culpepper jumped at the chance.

“I didn’t know what it was, but I said I’d be there,” he said.

The event attracted a sell-out crowd of 150 members. It included a legendary lineup of former UCF football players led by Culpepper and Milton, Blake Bortles, Tre’Quan Smith, Adrian Killins, Aaron Evans and Shaquem and Shaquill Griffin, among others. Current UCF coach Gus Malzahn and athletics director Terry Mohajir also attended.

Proceeds went to the Otis Anderson Jr. Foundation and Mission Control.

While the UCF football program has thrived since its inception in 1979, the ex-players in attendance have played a crucial role.

Bortles led the Knights to their first American Athletic Conference title and Bowl Championship Subdivision Bowl victory in the 2013 Fiesta Bowl. Milton led the team to a 13-0 season in 2017 capped with a victory over Auburn in the Chick-fil-A Peach Bowl and a claimed national championship title.

But Culpepper started it all by leading UCF into the Division IA game and national relevance.

“I get a lot of credit, but there were a lot of people who played the game with me who supported me and helped me get my job done,” Culpepper said. “I like to say I’ve played with a lot of junkyard dogs and I was one of them. You had to be that in these times.”

Culpepper is excited for the program to take its next step when it competes in the Big 12 Conference in 2023.

“I’m very proud,” Culpepper said. “The Big 12 is very prestigious and we deserve it. We’re going to do very well at this conference and it just goes to show that this program is solid and staying put. You had better watch out because UCF will be making a lot of noise in their conference.”

With so many great UCF players in one room, who is the greatest knight in attendance?

“I want to be remembered as the guy who played the game hard and smart and played to win,” Culpepper said. “I’m not interested in ranks or anything like that.”

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No question for Bortles.

“It has to be Daunte,” said Bortles, who completed 2011-13 with 7,598 passing yards and 56 total touchdowns. “The biggest, the strongest. He was a freak show and I’m sure he can still throw it.”

Meanwhile, Culpepper gives in to Milton.

“He’s a bad man,” Culpepper said. “I haven’t seen him play very often, but I’ve seen a lot of his games on TV and a lot of his films. Unfortunately he had a bad knee injury but was a great player and quarterback.”

Culpepper appreciates his place in school history.

“It’s been a great run, it’s been a great ride,” he said, “but now I’m the biggest cheerleader for UCF.”

This article first appeared on OrlandoSentinel.com. Email Matt Murschel mmurschel@orlandosentinel.com or follow him on Twitter at @osmattmurschel.

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Wildlife Rescue Center finds perfect perch in Enoch https://club-fuer-molosser.net/wildlife-rescue-center-finds-perfect-perch-in-enoch/ Thu, 16 Jun 2022 22:43:28 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/wildlife-rescue-center-finds-perfect-perch-in-enoch/ 50 years is worth the wait (and work) for a dream to come true. This is the Wildlife Rescue Center for Southern Utah’s greatest wildlife ambassadors, Martin and Susan Tyner. Groundbreaking for the center near the animal shelter and dog park in Enoch, Utah took place last Saturday. It was no ordinary groundbreaking, but a […]]]>

50 years is worth the wait (and work) for a dream to come true. This is the Wildlife Rescue Center for Southern Utah’s greatest wildlife ambassadors, Martin and Susan Tyner.

Groundbreaking for the center near the animal shelter and dog park in Enoch, Utah took place last Saturday. It was no ordinary groundbreaking, but a “putting down roots” ceremony to symbolize the laying of a secure foundation for providing world-class care to our feathered friends in Iron County and beyond. This included literally putting down roots as attendees were invited to help plant several trees. Of course, Tyner also brought out his 16-year-old feathered friend, a majestic golden eagle named Scout.

Joining the special occasion for the special occasion were Enoch Mayor Geoffrey Chesnut and City Administrator Rob Dotson, among others, who were instrumental in finding and providing land and water for the construction of the Tyners. Tyner expressed his gratitude, sharing that “The Mayor of Enoch and City Council rolled up their sleeves and presented us with a plan to lease the land to us for 100 years at a rate of $1 a year.” In Considering the benefits this facility will bring to Enoch (and beyond), it is a worthwhile investment. So much so that Bruce Hughes, a friend of the Southwest Wildlife Foundation, was willing to give a $100 check to fund a century of lifesaving.

Another special guest was Rocky Mountain Power’s Tom Heaton. Tyner expressed that it’s hard to imagine what Heaton and Rocky Mountain Power have done for Utah’s wildlife and the support they have provided to the foundation.

St. George’s Findlay Subaru also helped put down roots. For the past 9 years they have supported the Tyner’s and their Southwest Wildlife Foundation with funds from their annual Share the Love Campaigns. Curtis Whitehead, General Manager, was on hand to present this year’s check, which will go a long way towards funding wildlife rescues and enabling more education in the community. He said: “We are excited to be a part of this and to help him (Tyner) and are grateful for the work he is doing and what this facility will bring.”

Speaking of work, the Tyners have spent most of their lives saving lives — “angels,” as they’re called in his book, Healer of Angels. Currently, the Tyners use their home as a rescue and rehabilitation center, caring for all sizes and types of critters. Among those they help and house are 7 babies barn owls, 2 babies great horned owls, 5 babies kestrels, 2 golden eagles, 2 peregrine falcons and a Harris’ hawk.

Not only will the skills of this new facility allow them to better care for the angels they are helping to rescue and rehabilitate them, but it also boasts a world-class flight chamber, giving the birds the opportunity and space to really fly their wings to spread out to move and be healed enough to be released back to where they belong, to heaven.

Upon completion, the Wildlife Rescue Center will be located adjacent to the Enoch Animal Shelter and Dog Park. For more information about the Southwest Wildlife Foundation, visit www.gowildlife.org.

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Small Grants RFP to fund 8 Copper Country projects https://club-fuer-molosser.net/small-grants-rfp-to-fund-8-copper-country-projects/ Tue, 14 Jun 2022 18:28:00 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/small-grants-rfp-to-fund-8-copper-country-projects/ COPPER COUNTY, Mich. (WLUC) – The Portage Health Foundation’s annual Small Grants Request for Proposals (RFP) received a record number of applications, and after much deliberation, eight projects across Copper Country will be funded. Programs include park improvements, service dogs for area schools, a unique elderly wellbeing program in the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community and […]]]>

COPPER COUNTY, Mich. (WLUC) – The Portage Health Foundation’s annual Small Grants Request for Proposals (RFP) received a record number of applications, and after much deliberation, eight projects across Copper Country will be funded.

Programs include park improvements, service dogs for area schools, a unique elderly wellbeing program in the Keweenaw Bay Indian Community and more. All funds will help improve the health of parishioners of almost all ages. Below you will find an introduction to the eight funded projects. The PHF thanks all applicants and encourages them to keep the Foundation in mind for the future.

Keweenaw Bay Indian Community Elder Wellness Program ($3,000)

That Keweenaw Bay Indian Community (KBIC) will use funds to create and run a summer wellness program for seniors and seniors in the area. The Elder Wellness Program will tailor its wellness services to support Indian Health Services (IHS) initiatives. IHS works to support the emotional, spiritual, and physical well-being of tribal elders. In addition, wellness classes are designed according to the Health Aging Guidelines published by the National Institute on Aging.

District Support Dog for Adams Township Schools ($3,000)

Adams Township Schools will soon have access to a companion dog who is a source of positive reinforcement for students of all ages. The companion dog is designed to be motivating and stimulating, and to provide an extra layer of support to focus on learning. The dog is treated by K-12 art teacher Paige Lewandowski, who allows the dog to see students in both elementary school and middle/high school.

Renovation outside the classroom for the Calumet Art Center ($3,000)

That Art Center Calumet will use funding to create space for learning and design. They will use this space for classes that not only provide an opportunity to learn new skills, but also give adults and children a chance to socialize. The renovated space will create a courtyard setting, with an outdoor water spike to water the lawn and gardens, and an in-ground fire pit to light pottery, make copper bowls, and use as a social gathering place.

District Support Dog for Dollar Bay-Tamarack City Area Schools ($1,500)

This year students Dollar Bay- Tamarack City Area Schools enjoyed the presence of Bolt – the school’s new therapy dog ​​(pictured here). Bolt is still a puppy and as such has not been on full duty this year, but he is already helping by providing important tools for learning, engaging in social relationships and behavior and emotional regulation during these critical years in a student’s emotional development provides. This funding will help provide veterinary care, training and supplies to ensure Bolt is ready for full-time service in the fall.

Drinking Fountain at Driving Park for City of Hancock ($3,000)

One of the busiest areas for summer youth sporting activities is being upgraded with a new water fountain. The fountain will include a water bottle filling station and is a joint effort of grants from PHF, sports team fundraisers and the City of Hancock‘s Recreation Millage funded. The City will install and maintain the new fountain, which will provide clean, safe drinking water for users of the ball fields and surrounding outdoor recreation opportunities such as Maasto Hiihto Trails and the new dog park.

Village of Laurium Gipp Playground Improvement ($3,000)

That Village of Laurium will use funds to improve the playground at Amusement park Gipp. The park is now catering to the needs of those with special needs and requirements with the installation of a disabled swing. The long-term effects of this improvement will provide a greater quality of life for Laurium and the surrounding residents who would benefit from this type of equipment.

Live Search Team Tracking Devices for Superior Search and Rescue ($3,000)

The volunteers at Superior search and rescue will be a little safer after a $3,000 grant for new purchase Garmin Inreach GPS devices. The units are used by teams in the field for navigation, replacing units that are gradually failing. Not only will the new units provide updated maps for the volunteers, they will also offer the ability to follow teams live in the field in a small handheld device. In a missing persons incident, time is of the essence and every minute counts. Live data on a team’s location reduces confusion and improves the team’s ability to successfully complete its mission.

Nature Trail Improvements for Ontonagon Area Schools ($700)

students at Ontonagon area schools have long enjoyed their fitness/hiking/nature trails west of the school, and this summer they’ll be able to make some much-needed repairs thanks to $700 in funding. The funding will purchase the materials used by volunteers to make repairs to two failing and currently dangerous bridges. In the end, trail loops will be created that can be used again all year round.

The Small Grants Program allows grants of up to $3,000. It was announced on March 14th and the application deadline was April 8th. The winners were selected by the Foundation’s Grants Management Committee. The community is invited to subscribe to the Portage Health Foundation email newsletter to ensure they are kept informed of future funding opportunities as soon as possible. Subscribe for free at phfgive.org/newsletter. Find out more about funding opportunities at phfgive.org/grants.

Copyright 2022 WLUC. All rights reserved.

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Elder abuse awareness event | News, Sports, Jobs https://club-fuer-molosser.net/elder-abuse-awareness-event-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 13 Jun 2022 05:25:19 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/elder-abuse-awareness-event-news-sports-jobs/ (Photo by Michele Newbanks) June is Elder Abuse Awareness Month and the color purple is worn to show support for those who are being abused. Elisha Congleton, Deanna Green, Lori Hart and Kaleena Kelly wore purple to an awareness event at Buckeye Hills Regional Council on Saturday. An awareness event on […]]]>

(Photo by Michele Newbanks) June is Elder Abuse Awareness Month and the color purple is worn to show support for those who are being abused. Elisha Congleton, Deanna Green, Lori Hart and Kaleena Kelly wore purple to an awareness event at Buckeye Hills Regional Council on Saturday.

An awareness event on elder abuse was held at Buckeye Hills Regional Council on Saturday morning.

One of the big draws was a quarter auction, with proceeds going to Adult Protective Services, the Humane Society of the Ohio Valley and the Marietta Community Foundation to help APS customers with pet needs.

APS Director Deanna Green said the event went really well, although she didn’t know how much was raised.

“I still have to count the quarters” She said. “I feel like we had a really good turnout.”

There were 10 vendors and sold 60 out of 75 paddles.

“We had a lot of fun. It was a good day,” said Green.

28 items were auctioned, some of which stood out.

Lori Hart, APS worker, said there was a large garden basket valued at over $100.

Green said a Marietta College swag bag was highly coveted.

“It was decorated with autographed signatures and balls and a picture of the stadium,” She said.

A Cincinnati Bengals shirt and cap were also quickly snapped up.

“It was a beautiful thing because the Bengals are going to the Super Bowl,” said Hart.

About 10 vendors set up booths to provide resources for seniors.

Gerri VanNoy, Information and Support Specialist at BHRC, helped staff the City Council stand. She said it’s important for people to recognize elder abuse.

“Most of what we come into contact with is self-neglect” She said. “They don’t have running water. They have no food and are calling us because they need help.”

In these cases, they must call APS and inform them of the situation.

Right at Home owner Chrisy Heiss had a booth and said her company provides non-medical and personal home care for seniors.

“I’m helping a client walk his dog in the morning because he’s afraid of falling outside and needs safety.” She said.

Your staff aren’t nurses, so they can’t administer medication, but they can help with reminders to take it.

“We are excited to be another resource in the region for seniors,” She said. Right at Home provides services such as meal preparation, light housekeeping, laundry, bathing, dressing, eating/feeding and companionship.

Green said Saturday’s resource fair is the APS’ big event for Elder Abuse Awareness Month, but the signs will remain at the Armory, People’s Bank, Children’s Services and the Washington County Department of Job and Labor Office for the rest of the month Family Services on Gilman Avenue.

She said this isn’t the only event APS is holding. Many revolve around the holidays.

Hart said they donate meals to the elderly at Christmas, and Green said they work with Belair’s Bistro in Belpre to distribute meals to older adults who can’t get out.

Older veterans were honored with soup, rolls and cookies on Veterans Day last year, Hart said. They hope to do it again this year.

Green said they are also hosting a seniors’ Christmas “to make sure people who don’t have families get something for Christmas.”

Community members and businesses donate merchandise to be given away. Hart said they call their customers and ask what they need for Christmas.

Green said customers made a wish list.

“Do you need a pair of shoes? Do you need a coat?” said Hart.

Green said it’s amazing how many people are asking for standard garments.

Some things were rather unusual for a Christmas present.

“I got someone a vacuum” said Green. “There are things you take for granted until you have a steady income.”

A store bought a lady glasses, Hart said.

Michele Newbanks can be reached at mnewbanks@mariettatimes.com.

At a glance

∫ Proceeds from the quarterly auction will go towards supporting APS customers with pet funds.

∫ Proceeds will be invested in a Marietta Community Foundation fund.

∫ They are used to provide short-term help with pet care when APS customers are unable to do so.

Source: Adult Protection Services.



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Historic Presque Isle Hotel reopens with new restaurant and social mission https://club-fuer-molosser.net/historic-presque-isle-hotel-reopens-with-new-restaurant-and-social-mission/ Sat, 04 Jun 2022 05:00:00 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/historic-presque-isle-hotel-reopens-with-new-restaurant-and-social-mission/ PRESQUE ISLE, Maine – One of Presque Isle’s newest business ventures uses an idea from Peru and Jamaica to breathe new life into downtown and bring a 90-year-old landmark into the 21st century. Ignite Presque Isle, a non-profit community development organization, acquired the historic Northeastland Hotel last year and is renovating the building. The group […]]]>

PRESQUE ISLE, Maine – One of Presque Isle’s newest business ventures uses an idea from Peru and Jamaica to breathe new life into downtown and bring a 90-year-old landmark into the 21st century.

Ignite Presque Isle, a non-profit community development organization, acquired the historic Northeastland Hotel last year and is renovating the building. The group anticipates a fall opening for a new restaurant and business collaboration center.

The hotel is one of the latest projects the City of Presque Isle has supported in its goal to revitalize downtown and make it more business and community friendly.

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K9s For Warriors celebrates the opening of the first phase of the service dog training facility https://club-fuer-molosser.net/k9s-for-warriors-celebrates-the-opening-of-the-first-phase-of-the-service-dog-training-facility/ Thu, 02 Jun 2022 04:00:00 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/k9s-for-warriors-celebrates-the-opening-of-the-first-phase-of-the-service-dog-training-facility/ K9s For Warriors, the nation’s largest provider of trained service dogs for military veterans, held a ribbon cutting ceremony on May 16 to commemorate the opening of the first phase of the Davis Family Mega Kennel. The facility, which is minutes from the national headquarters of the nonprofit Shari Duval, is located on a two-acre […]]]>

K9s For Warriors, the nation’s largest provider of trained service dogs for military veterans, held a ribbon cutting ceremony on May 16 to commemorate the opening of the first phase of the Davis Family Mega Kennel. The facility, which is minutes from the national headquarters of the nonprofit Shari Duval, is located on a two-acre lot donated by the Davis family in northeast Florida.

Phase one of the Davis Family Mega Kennel will allow K9s For Warriors to train 88 more assistance dogs in training, dramatically reducing the four year waiting list. After completing the second phase, the waiting list will be cut in half. Phase one consists of 68 kennels, 20 wellness kennels, a K9 enrichment area, a food storage building and by the end of summer a splash pool.

Part of the funding for the phase one buildings was provided by the Davis family, Lee and Dorothy Thomas, veterans of Foar from Home and Flagler Health+.
“Today is a great day for our veterans across the country and for so many dogs waiting to be given a chance,” said Rory Diamond, CEO of K9s For Warriors. “In 2011, Shari Duval set out to improve the lives of veterans dealing with the invisible wounds of war by providing them with rescued service dogs. Today we remain steadfast in our mission to save lives. The Davis Family Mega Kennel will allow us to rescue more dogs and place them in the hands of our veterans in need, thereby changing their life path for the better. This facility will also drastically reduce the time our future warriors will have to wait to obtain a service dog, which currently extends to 2026.”

With the overwhelming demand for service dogs and the ongoing veteran suicide problem with nearly 20 veterans dying by suicide every day, the Davis Family Mega Kennel is imperative. K9s For Warriors is committed to ending veteran suicide and helping veterans who are dealing with the unseen wounds of war, including PTSD, traumatic brain injuries and military sexual trauma.

The first phase cost around $8 million to complete. Construction of the second phase will begin in the coming months with support from the State of Florida and donors.

State Senator Travis Hutson and State Assemblyman Sam Garrison lobbied for $2.5 million in state funding for the second phase. State Senator Jennifer Bradley and State Representative Cord Byrd also pledged $750,000 to help with operating costs. In addition, the David and Cheryl Duffield Foundation provided a donation to complete the veterinary clinic.

To learn more about K9s For Warriors and to support the charitable programs, visit k9sforwarriors.org.

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Salem Pool Opens June 4 | News, Sports, Jobs https://club-fuer-molosser.net/salem-pool-opens-june-4-news-sports-jobs/ Mon, 30 May 2022 05:23:30 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/salem-pool-opens-june-4-news-sports-jobs/ The pool and wading pool at Centennial Park open swimming season with free entry on opening day from 1pm to 7pm, June 4th. “We’re ready to go” Recreational Supervisor/Pool Manager Amber Smith said. Regular hours of operation are 1pm to 7pm, seven days a week, with an adult swim for an hour from […]]]>

The pool and wading pool at Centennial Park open swimming season with free entry on opening day from 1pm to 7pm, June 4th.

“We’re ready to go” Recreational Supervisor/Pool Manager Amber Smith said.

Regular hours of operation are 1pm to 7pm, seven days a week, with an adult swim for an hour from noon on weekdays. The concession stand is open daily from 2pm to 6pm and offers hot dogs, chips, candy bars, popsicles, soft drinks and water.

Smith said people are already calling to rent the pool after hours, noting that every weekend in June is already reserved. Pool rental is $35 per hour and $15 per hour for each lifeguard on duty.

Day admission is $5 for adults, $4 for students and seniors (62 plus), and $3 for children under 5. Season passes are $60 for an individual, $100 for a family of five, and $25 for each additional family member (up to five).

Screening at Band Shell at Waterworth Memorial Park on June 4th at 9:30pm, the first summer film is Clifford the Big Red Dog.

Both Smith and Parks Director Shane Franks said they are still looking for artists to join the celebrations for Art in the Park on June 25 from 10am-2pm at Band Shell at Waterworth Memorial Park. Smith said they already have 18 artists and three cast members, as well as food trucks. Some of the art forms represented include etching, carving and painting, wood carving, painting, pencil drawing, hand carved wooden spoons, acoustic guitars, pen, ink and watercolor, authors, dancers, stamped greeting cards, watercolours, floral wall display, prints, pour paint and fluid art and acrylics.

There will also be a Balloon Artist, Caricature Artist, Sidewalk Chalk Artist, Boy Scout Troop 80774, Burchfield Homestead Museum, Salem City Schools, Salem Parks & Recreation and the Salem Public Library.

Smith said she is also looking for organizations or clubs to sponsor activities during Salem City’s fireworks pre-event from 5 p.m. to 9 p.m. July 3 at Waterworth Memorial Park.

During the recent Salem Parks Commission meeting, the board approved a project for Stitle Construction to repair widening cracks in the toilet near the band case at a cost of $13,500. Franks said the northeast corner of the building has serious cracks, with the entire corner being unstable. The southwest corner also shows serious cracks and delaminations.

Franks said the Salem Community Foundation will cover the costs from the Ralph J. Smith fund.

Commission vice-chair Lucille Karnofel said the need was definitely there, but she was bothered that there was only one offer. Franks said he was happy with the offer and so were SCF. Parks Foreman Jim Grimm also said he made some phone calls and no one could come out to look.

Karnofel asked what the not yet finished disc golf was all about and got information “workers” by Grim. Franks pointed out that April was mostly wet and they were three or four weeks behind schedule. They have also worked on preparing the pool for the opening, preparing the ball courts for play and mowing grass. It took four and a half days to fill the pool, and a squad of 24 scouts from Troops 6 and 3 helped clean the pool area in preparation for the opening, Grimm said.




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Dems compete in important ABQ House races https://club-fuer-molosser.net/dems-compete-in-important-abq-house-races/ Fri, 27 May 2022 04:05:00 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/dems-compete-in-important-abq-house-races/ The New Mexico State Capitol in Santa Fe. (Morgan Lee/Associated Press) Copyright © 2022 Albuquerque Journal SANTA FE — Four Democratic primaries in Albuquerque are set to help shape the composition of the House of Representatives as moderates and progressives compete for influence within the party and the legislature. None of the four seats in […]]]>
The New Mexico State Capitol in Santa Fe. (Morgan Lee/Associated Press)

Copyright © 2022 Albuquerque Journal

SANTA FE — Four Democratic primaries in Albuquerque are set to help shape the composition of the House of Representatives as moderates and progressives compete for influence within the party and the legislature.

None of the four seats in the House of Representatives have an elected incumbent seeking re-election, and three of the four seats are heavily Democratic-leaning, making the primary election all the more meaningful.

Races are scattered across the city with venues on the West Side, South Valley and International District.

The contests are playing out as Democrats are set to elect a new leadership after House Speaker Brian Egolf of Santa Fe resigns at the end of the year.

Two of the potential candidates who could replace him as Speaker of the House — House Majority Leader Javier Martínez, a progressive from Albuquerque, and Representative Patricia Lundstrom, a moderate from Gallup — have been active in some legislative races and distributing campaign funds.

But candidates in Albuquerque’s districts say they are seeking the election on their own terms, responding to issues that resonate with voters.

Northwest ABQ

Democratic House candidate Cynthia Borrego, a former Albuquerque city councilwoman and business owner, said she was struck by the number of dogs she sees knocking on doors — a sign of voters’ concerns about crime in the city.

“I have liberals who support me, conservatives who support me and moderates who support me,” she said, “and I’m really proud of that.”

Borrego competes with Darrell Deaguero, president of a construction workers’ union, for representation in House District 17, which includes the neighborhoods around Coors and the Paseo del Norte NW.

Deaguero said concern for children — their safety and future — is a priority issue he hears from voters. He said he’s letting his issues and accomplishments speak for themselves, rather than labeling his campaign a moderate or progressive label.

“When you’re on a construction site, nobody asks if you’re a Democrat or a Republican, much less if you’re progressive or moderate,” he said in a written statement to the Journal. “People just want to know if you’re going to stick around and deliver for them and that’s why I’m running.”

District 17 is now held by Democratic Rep. Deborah Armstrong, but she is not seeking re-election and the boundaries have shifted significantly.

Borrego has received financial backing from Chevron and other oil and gas companies, as well as Lundstrom, Chair of the House Appropriations and Finance Committee. Deaguero, on the other hand, has the support of many unions and Martínez, the House Majority Leader.

In a questionnaire for the magazine, Borrego said she supports changing New Mexico’s laws to make it easier to keep people accused of certain violent crimes behind bars pending trial. Deaguero said decisions should be made on a case-by-case basis, with a “strict threshold for incarceration” based on a number of factors.

The winner of the Democratic primary will face either Ellis McMath or Joshua Taylor Neal fighting for the Republican nomination.

District 17 has been held by a Democrat since at least 1983, although the newly drawn boundaries suggest it could be a swing district this fall. Democrats had a 1.4 percentage point advantage over Republicans in the new county lines, according to an analysis of last decade’s elections by Research & Polling Inc., the state’s county redistricting contractor.

Southwest ABQ

In a nearby county in southwest Albuquerque, Democratic voters are weighing in another contentious primary.

Former Rep. Eleanor Chavez, executive director of a hospital workers’ union, competes with Cherise Quezada, president of the Route 66 West Neighborhood Association and wife of Bernalillo County Commissioner Steven Michael Quezada.

Chavez has received financial support from the Conservation Voters New Mexico Action Fund, labor unions, and a number of progressive Democrats.

She would bring extensive experience to the seat, she said, having previously served in the House of Representatives from 2009 to 2012. She describes herself as progressive.

“I’ve always been involved in the community,” Chavez said. “I feel like I have my finger on the heartbeat of the community.”

Quezada, on the other hand, has received donations from Lundstrom and other pro-business Democrats. She said she too has a lot of experience, having served as a staffer for the City Council and State House.

It describes itself as “business-friendly” and, depending on the topic, both progressive and moderate.

“I think there has to be a balance — I’d like to bring that to the table,” Quezada said. “Every decision you make has unintended consequences.”

Martínez, the House Majority Leader, has donated to both candidates.

House District 26 includes neighborhoods near Unser and Interstate 40. It is currently represented by Democrat Georgene Louis, who is not seeking re-election after being arrested for drunk driving.

The district is heavily Democratic and the primary election winner will face Republican Patrick Sais.

valley race

Another key feature race is taking place at House District 12 in the South Valley, where Art De La Cruz is running to retain the seat after being appointed to fill the unexpired term of Brittney Barreras, who resigned earlier this year .

De La Cruz, a former Bernalillo County commissioner, is campaigning for the Democratic nomination alongside challengers Melissa Armijo, Executive Administrator of the National Hispanic Cultural Center Foundation, and Nicole Olonovich, CEO of an energy company.

The leading fundraisers in the running are De La Cruz – whose donors include Martinez, a teachers’ union and a number of local businesses – and Armijo, whose supporters include Conservation Voters and a number of Democratic lawmakers.

No Republican or Libertarian candidate ran for the seat.

International District

In House District 19, which is based in the International District, two Democrats are seeking the nomination to replace Rep. Kay Bounkeua, who is not seeking re-election.

Janelle Anyanonu, an office manager and member of the New Mexico Black Central Organizing Committee, is up against Colton Dean, a paramedic and sterilization technician.

Anyanonu has a significant fundraising lead with about $19,600 in her campaign account, including donations from conservation voters and at least four Democratic lawmakers. Dean has about $2,200 in his account.

The winner will face Republican Kathleen Jackson in the fall. It is one of the most Democratic home districts in the state, according to an analysis by Research & Polling Inc.

In all, Albuquerque voters are weighing in for eight hard-fought House primary elections. All 70 seats in the House of Representatives are up for election this year.

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