Dog odor – Club Fuer Molosser http://club-fuer-molosser.net/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 16:51:56 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/06/icon-88.png Dog odor – Club Fuer Molosser http://club-fuer-molosser.net/ 32 32 Sheriff’s Office Daily Activity Log (Friday, November 18) https://club-fuer-molosser.net/sheriffs-office-daily-activity-log-friday-november-18/ Tue, 22 Nov 2022 10:26:45 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/sheriffs-office-daily-activity-log-friday-november-18/ VAN WERT COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE SHERIFF THOMAS M. RIGGENBACH DAILY ACTIVITY LOG The information provided allows for timely insight into events in our community. The crimes reported here are preliminary investigations, conducted in the field by deputies, and may or may not be turned over to a detective for further investigation. The information provided may […]]]>

VAN WERT COUNTY SHERIFF’S OFFICE

SHERIFF THOMAS M. RIGGENBACH

DAILY ACTIVITY LOG

The information provided allows for timely insight into events in our community. The crimes reported here are preliminary investigations, conducted in the field by deputies, and may or may not be turned over to a detective for further investigation. The information provided may prove, upon further investigation, to be incorrect or false. Some details of these incidents have been removed due to a possible follow-up investigation into the incident and/or for confidentiality reasons.

Friday, November 18, 2022

6:26 a.m. – Deputies responded to an area of ​​Liberty Township attempting to locate a subject reported to be carrying drugs.

08:12 – Deputies responded to the village of Convoi for a motor vehicle accident. Unit #1 was eastbound on West tuly
Street. No. 1 unit slid on the ice and exited on the right side of the roadway and struck a fire hydrant on the south side of the road about 15 feet east of north Linn Street. Unit One was a 1992 Mercury Grand Marquis driven by Daniel Tussing. No injuries were reported.

11:04 a.m. – Deputies responded to a residence in Washington Township to help a locked subject out of his vehicle.

11:32 a.m. – Deputies attended a residence in Union Township to make contact with a matter for the Lutheran Hospital.

11:38 p.m. – Sent Delphos Fire and Middle Point to an area of ​​U.S. Route 30 in Washington Township to investigate a propane smell.

12:11 p.m. – Deputies responded to a residential alarm in York Township.

12:53 p.m. – Dog Warden responded to a location in the town of Van Wert following a complaint about a dog left in a car.

2:35 p.m. – Deputies responded to a location in the town of Van Wert to help a subject locked in his car.

5:55 p.m. – Deputies responded to a location on Wren Landeck Road at Willshire Municipality to verify the report of a broken down vehicle on the road.

6.23pm – Deputies responded to a location in the town of Delphos to help a subject locked out of their vehicle.

8:26 p.m. – Deputies responded to an area in Pleasant Township to verify a reckless operation report.

10:39 p.m. – Deputies responded to an area in tuly Township on a motor vehicle accident report. The incident was investigated by the Ohio State Highway Patrol.

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How to Succeed as a Seller in a Changing Real Estate Market https://club-fuer-molosser.net/how-to-succeed-as-a-seller-in-a-changing-real-estate-market/ Thu, 17 Nov 2022 12:50:36 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/how-to-succeed-as-a-seller-in-a-changing-real-estate-market/ Realtor Dayv Morgan. While it’s debatable whether the Maricopa real estate market has entered a buyers’ market, it appears the balance has shifted since six months ago when the market was decidedly in favor of sellers. This year, interest rates have doubled, which has affected the number of potential buyers. With fewer buyers looking, the […]]]>
Realtor Dayv Morgan.

While it’s debatable whether the Maricopa real estate market has entered a buyers’ market, it appears the balance has shifted since six months ago when the market was decidedly in favor of sellers.

This year, interest rates have doubled, which has affected the number of potential buyers. With fewer buyers looking, the market has become quite competitive.

In order to successfully navigate this market as a seller, there are a few things you need to keep in mind:

Patience and price
Homes are still selling, but not at the rate they were earlier this year. The days of selling a home within a week of listing are behind us. Most sit for at least 30 days, which can turn into 60 or 90 days if your home isn’t priced correctly. Currently, homes are selling at 94% of original price and 98-99% of final price, which means most sellers have to make a price reduction or two. All of this means that if your home is priced right, it will sell for close to what you’re asking for – and much faster.

incentives
New home builders offer incentives including paying closing costs and offering lower interest rates. These are concessions that you can also offer that will make your home more attractive. Be sure to communicate your willingness to deal in the MLS listing details. This will lead to more visits and in this market this is again an important part of the process. The more traffic you can drive to your home, the more likely it will sell.

Preparation
Your home should be tip-top. Everything you can do to make your home more attractive, both inside and out, should be done.

Consider a deep cleaning of your home. You might not notice that pet smell from your dog or cat, but a potential buyer will.

In this market, buyers are becoming more discerning and if they see a problem with your home, they won’t tell you, but rather move on to the next one.

Work on curb appeal. And if your finishes are outdated, such as paint schemes, countertops, or even carpeting, it would be a good idea to refresh them.

For sellers who sign up with me, I offer a program where I will lend up to $10,000 to upgrade these items, which will be repaid at closing.

Dayv Morgan is a Maricopa Realtor and owner of HomeSmart Premier.

This sponsored content was first published in the November edition of In Maricopa magazine.

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The reason for large muzzles on a white-tailed deer | News, Sports, Jobs https://club-fuer-molosser.net/the-reason-for-large-muzzles-on-a-white-tailed-deer-news-sports-jobs/ Sat, 12 Nov 2022 07:34:35 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/the-reason-for-large-muzzles-on-a-white-tailed-deer-news-sports-jobs/ Of all the senses a white-tailed deer possesses, its nose is often the one that arouses the most interest, and for good reason. A whitetail deer’s nose is outwardly its greatest feature, which is why it gets the most press, so to speak. The average deer has about 290 million – plus or […]]]>

Of all the senses a white-tailed deer possesses, its nose is often the one that arouses the most interest, and for good reason. A whitetail deer’s nose is outwardly its greatest feature, which is why it gets the most press, so to speak.

The average deer has about 290 million – plus or minus a million – olfactory receptors. Smell is the deer’s ultimate superpower, superior even to its hearing and sight. Although these large ears give them an advantage in sound pick-up, the deer’s hearing range is similar to that of a human. Therefore, it is nowhere near as powerful as their sense of smell. Estimates indicate that a white-tailed deer can detect human scent for up to 10 days after departing.

What makes a deer’s sense of smell so elite? First consider the inside of a deer’s nose. It contains hundreds of thousands, if not millions, of nerve cells. In fact, there are probably thousands of groups of cells in the nose, and each group can detect an odor. This means that a deer has a group of cells in its nose that can detect acorns, and others that detect alfalfa, corn, certain twigs, leaf litter, and dogs. There are nerve cells dedicated to detecting other deer, human deodorant, gasoline on gloves, etc.

You name the scent, and a deer has a group of cells located in a small region of the nose that can smell that scent.

Once that scent reaches those receptor cells, it triggers an area of ​​the deer’s brain. For example, when a deer smells an acorn, it activates acorn nerve cells in the nose and this then sends a message to a part of the brain that leads to a pattern of behavior. Therein lies the key to how deer catch you. If a young deer has a bad experience with a dog, a pattern of behavior is created in that deer’s brain. The next time the deer smells a dog, the deer runs away. But if that deer grows up in a park where there’s no hunting and people walk their dogs on leashes all the time, the scent of a dog probably won’t trigger the same negative reaction.

Let’s take a look at this way, which many of us can relate to. If a deer is growing up in an urban environment, scents it smells related to humans will not trigger a negative response. But if that deer first smells a human scent in the wild and the initial encounter was negative, then the moment the deer smells the same human scent again, it runs away.

Let’s put this into perspective. Just as rabbit hunters know how much a dog can smell and what it can smell, it can help us better understand what we face with a whitetail deer’s nose and the ability of a deer to smell. The reason this information is important is because you need to realize that a white-tailed deer’s sense of smell is almost a third better than that of a canine or a dog.

Smell is the dog’s dominant sense, which is why we can assume that a whitetail deer’s sense of smell is also the dominant sense. So much so that a large part of his brain is devoted to the analysis of odors. Dogs and white-tailed deer have two giant olfactory bulbs attached to their brains that decode every smell they encounter. The bulbs weigh about 60 grams, four times more than human olfactory bulbs. Given that a canine brain is 1/10th the size of a human, that means the canine brain has 40 times more of its brain devoted to smell than we do, and the deer’s sense of smell of Virginie is far superior to that.

It’s no wonder, then, that a dog’s sense of smell is considered so superior to a human’s. In tests, dogs have been able to pick up chemical solutions that make up one or two parts in a trillion. That’s like smelling a rotten apple in two billion barrels. This is relative to a whitetail deer’s sense of smell, as some hunters believe they can cover their human scent with camouflage scents.

If the white-tailed deer can smell better than a dog, even a dog can detect different smells in the same area, at the rate of two parts to a trillion. I don’t mean to hurt the feelings of whitetail deer makers, but you can’t mask your human whitetail deer scent, you can only try to control it.

The source of the dog’s and white-tailed deer’s exceptional sense of smell is its moist muzzle. The moist, leathery surface of the muzzle acts like Velcro, capturing even the smallest scent molecules and then dissolving them so the dog’s internal scent receptor cells can analyze them properly. To keep their nose moist, a dog must produce a constant supply of mucus through their nasal cavities. Scientists estimate that the average dog produces a pint of this mucus every day, and a white-tailed deer produces even more.

Dogs can really smell fear. If a dog walks into a room that a frightened dog has just walked out of, it will appear anxious and agitated. This is not, as many claim, some sort of ESP-like response. It is caused by an odor, an alarm pheromone, which is produced by the anal glands of frightened dogs.

We understand that a whitetail deer’s nose is so large that the animal can sense emotion. That’s why if you’ve ever seen a whitetail deer come in that hasn’t seen you, you’re high in the air, don’t move, and then suddenly the deer is staring at you like it has a sixth sense. It’s very possible that the white-tailed deer can sense your emotions to some degree. Snicker all you want, but we have a lot more to learn about the white-tailed deer’s sense of smell.

Dogs can detect scents up to 40 feet underground, so deer can detect them even deeper than that depth. They have been used to detect leaky gas lines. They can also smell insects embedded in the floor or woodwork. In the United States, dogs are used to detect termite infestations. Dogs can also pick up the slightest scent from other creatures.

Dogs can smell human fingerprints that are a week old. If dogs can do this, then you must know that a whitetail deer’s ability to smell human scent must be much greater. That’s why you shouldn’t check hunting cameras all the time or keep wandering around your hunting area out of sheer curiosity. Estimates indicate that a white-tailed deer can detect human scent for up to 10 days after departing.

Dogs’ noses are so sensitive that they can even smell electricity. In an experiment, a researcher discovered that a dog could sense which of the two compartments contained an electric current. He concluded that it was because the charge caused the release of small amounts of ozone that the dog could detect. Now, we can also assume that while a whitetail deer’s sense of smell is much more advanced than a dog’s, that whitetail deer can sense objects such as electricity. Are you beginning to understand what you’re up against when trying to figure out just how great a deer’s sense of smell must really be?

Dogs and white-tailed deer can tell from the smell of a cow’s urine if she is in estrus or in heat. Farmers train dogs to do this so they know the best time to introduce a bull for breeding.

Dogs react in different ways to different smells. In tests, for example, dogs have been found to relax when the aroma of lavender is introduced into their environment. Chamomile also makes dogs calmer. Perhaps at some point, whitetail deer hunting will figure out what smells make the whitetail deer calmer so that we can hunt them more easily. Rosemary and peppermint, on the other hand, make dogs more excited.

When it comes to dogs and whitetail deer, all humans have a unique scent. They can select people based on the body and other scents they project. Scientists think the only way a dog could not tell two people apart would be if they were identical twins with an identical diet. The twins should also keep quiet.

Therefore, think about this. The deer you are hunting may know the difference between the smell of the farmer working in the field who poses no threat to him, and you, the hunter looking to kill him. That’s why often when I’m hunting in an area where cattle are around, I’ll deliberately walk into a big, cold, unpleasant cow pie.

Let’s go a little further with the white-tailed deer’s ability to smell. If you are the hunter who wears blanket scents, be aware that white-tailed deer likely associate your blanket scents with those of a predator.

As a result, dogs can track human scents over long distances. Scientists believe they can detect the difference in scents of different footprints to determine which direction their prey is heading. They can do this 20 minutes after a person has passed even if the prints are made only one second apart. If this is true then again with the white tailed deer having a more developed sense of smell it is very possible that the white tailed deer can sense which way you are heading and avoid you by going the other meaning. Laugh all you want, but it’s that kind of knowledge that puts the trophy deer on the wall. You need to understand the white-tailed deer’s sense of smell.

Honestly, there is no way to reduce human odor 100%. In a mirage of products that really don’t help whitetail deer hunters, it’s hard to understand what deer hunters can do to avoid being smelled by whitetail deer. After all the smoke clears, only four tools are available to minimize detection by white-tailed deer due to their keen sense of smell. We’ll talk about all four to help you land a trophy male. They include silver ion clothing technology, wind play, stand height and products that help keep you clean so you can stack the odds in your favor. Because the white-tailed deer’s sense of smell is acute and must be treated with honesty and frankness.

The best way to avoid the white-tailed deer’s sense of smell is to “play the wind.” This means in a nutshell that the hunter always hunts and approaches a hunting area from a direction where the wind does not bring human scent to where he believes the deer are positioned.

Never hunt when the wind is bad, even just a few degrees. It’s tempting to take every opportunity to get away from work and hunt, but resist the temptation to go anyway. All it takes is a good sniff at close range and a mature male will abandon not only his movement pattern, but the immediate vicinity, perhaps for the entire season.

Deer use their noses to survive every day, 24/7/365. As hunters, we spend very little time in the white-tailed deer world. When trying to beat a deer’s nose, no matter adult buck or yearling doe, chase the wind. Use the wind to your advantage, don’t push it. If the wind is not good, change your configuration. None of us want to be blown away and see that white flag fly away.



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Waynesboro PD K-9 officer shows his skills https://club-fuer-molosser.net/waynesboro-pd-k-9-officer-shows-his-skills/ Tue, 08 Nov 2022 04:58:00 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/waynesboro-pd-k-9-officer-shows-his-skills/ WAYNESBORO, Miss. (WDAM) – The Waynesboro Police Department has a furry friend to help them catch criminals. Jagger is their department’s K-9 officer, and in 2018 the citizens of Waynesboro helped buy him. Now Jagger is trained in apprehension, narcotics and tracking. “With illegal drug detection, you can run this dog around a vehicle, and […]]]>

WAYNESBORO, Miss. (WDAM) – The Waynesboro Police Department has a furry friend to help them catch criminals.

Jagger is their department’s K-9 officer, and in 2018 the citizens of Waynesboro helped buy him. Now Jagger is trained in apprehension, narcotics and tracking.

“With illegal drug detection, you can run this dog around a vehicle, and if it detects that vehicle, that’s an alert that our officers can use for probable cause to search that vehicle,” said Chief Holt Ross.

However, managing a K-9 officer takes a lot of time and responsibility, including constant training.

“Most people think, ‘Oh, they cycle for 12 hours, eight hours, whatever shift, and then they go home,’ and that goes beyond that,” said Cpl. Geoff Patton. “You also have to train with them when you’re off duty. I will train at least once a month with Southern State K-9.

Paton says one of Jagger’s great assets is his canine scent, which he says is significantly better than humans.

“If there’s something inside that vehicle or inside a house or around a house and everything, even somewhere buried underground, the dog can always pick it up,” said Paton.

In fact, some specialized training includes narcotics apprehension and search.

Paton says all they know is that the toy they’re using is associated with that smell.

“In this case, Jagger and I are going to use a little squeaky toy, and once Jagger shows a positive indication and makes his positive stance where he’s sitting and staring, I’ll come up behind him, and throw that toy in. .” said Patton.

The Waynesboro Police Department is grateful to have Jagger and will continue to train him daily to ensure he does not lose these specific skills to the City of Waynesboro.

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Distress call made by K-9 locked in car; 2 motorcyclists arrested after chase – Your Local News https://club-fuer-molosser.net/distress-call-made-by-k-9-locked-in-car-2-motorcyclists-arrested-after-chase-your-local-news/ Sat, 05 Nov 2022 22:02:29 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/distress-call-made-by-k-9-locked-in-car-2-motorcyclists-arrested-after-chase-your-local-news/ The City of Monroe Police Department reported the following incidents for the period October 27 to November 2, 2022. Due to its length, this report has been divided into five parts. This is the last part. Please note that an arrest or charge does not constitute a conviction. Appeal disputed – Birch St. A woman […]]]>

The City of Monroe Police Department reported the following incidents for the period October 27 to November 2, 2022. Due to its length, this report has been divided into five parts. This is the last part. Please note that an arrest or charge does not constitute a conviction.

  • Appeal disputed – Birch St. A woman and her father were found in a red Ford Mustang at their residence in Tanglewood Dr. All is well.
  • Welfare Check – Nowell St. In reference to a couple having a dispute. The complainant was a third party who wished to remain anonymous. Contact made with the woman who said the man had left the residence. Report taken.
  • Warrant Service – Alcovy St. Female named on the spot with an active probation violation warrant. She was taken into custody and transported to the Walton County Sheriff’s Office and turned over to jail staff without incident.
  • Downed Power Lines – Cedar Lane – Referring to lines across the roadway not allowing a school bus to pass. The lines were cable lines, lifted above the bus and allowed to pass. Everything is fine.
  • Threats – Fleeting manner – The complainant notifies the father of her children that he is threatening to take her children. Report taken. Temporary Protection Order process advised.
  • Dispute – Sorrells St. In reference to two housemates who got into an altercation at Cook St. Civil remedies advised due to lack of probable cause and conflicting statements.
  • Juvenile Problem – Classic Trail. In reference to the 10-year-old plaintiff saying his mum was going to punish him for getting in trouble at school. I spoke with mom, and everything was fine.
  • Suspicious Vehicle – Hammock Park. Occupants of a white crown victim smoking marijuana. They were gone when the officers arrived
  • Follow-up – Cherry Hill Legion in reference to a female topic requesting information on the TPO process. Suggested remedies.
  • EMS Support – Plaza Dr; In reference to a named subject who collapses on the sidewalk of Arnold Pointe properties. Witnesses said he was dropped off by a black sedan and left moments after the incident. He was transported to Walton Piedmont for further medical attention.
  • Lost and Found – Felker Park in reference to a named subject stating that his keys were stolen while coaching football. The keys have been located. Everything is fine.
  • Civil Issue – Mill Stone Bluff in reference to a verbal argument between roommates over rent. Suggested remedies.
  • Mental Subject – Sorrells St: In reference, a female subject informing her grandfather was having a mental episode. The GCAL facility has been contacted.
  • Suspicious Person – Gliding Lane in reference to the caller claiming to have seen two men going through his bins in his garden. Everything is fine.
  • Juvenile Complaint – Pine Park Street in reference to a female subject stating that her son was disruptive and swearing. Report taken.
  • Vehicle Pursuit – HWY 138 to HWY 78. Vehicle pursuit was initiated due to (2) sport bikes driving recklessly on HWY 138. Upon investigation, two subjects were arrested for improper passing, violation of the license class, reckless driving, absconding/attempted crime avoidance, passing through no passing zone, driving on wrong side of roadway, no license plate or license plate, no proof of insurance and non-compliance traffic control device. Orders taken.
  • Property Found – Walker Dr. The complainant indicated that she found a needle while her roommate was cleaning her room. no visible drug residue on the needle and the plaintiff was advised of civil remedies.
  • Suicide attempt – S Broad St: In reference to a man attempting to strangle himself with a rope.
  • Civil Issue -140 Blaine Street in reference to plaintiff sold a vehicle and the other party failed to make two payments.
  • Rape – Wheelhouse Ln. Met a complainant who said her juvenile daughter was raped. Delivered to the CID.
  • Robbery Report – Blaine St: Named subject reported that items were taken from his residence by the county. Subject wanted to make sure his trailer was still on site at 5th Street. Everything was fine.
  • Threats – Windsor Drive in reference to the Complainant’s friend’s ex-boyfriend who threatened the Complainant and her sister. No direct threats were made and he was told to travel to the county where the subject resides to obtain a TPO.
  • Warrant Attempt – Alcovy St. Male subject surrendered on probation, was transported to Walton County Jail and released to jail staff without incident.
  • Suspicious People – W. Spring St. In reference to a man and a woman begging outside Wal-Mart. They were told they couldn’t and left with no problem.
  • Scam – Oak Ridge. The complainant said she spent $3,300 on gift cards to purchase a 2012 F150 and cannot get the vehicle. Report completed.
  • Drug Complaint – Etten Dr. In reference to the owner stating that she believes an occupant of one of the bedrooms was smoking drugs in the bedroom because the dust in the bedroom was black. No smell was present inside the house or room. Advised remedies.
  • Property Damage – S. Madison Ave. Plaintiff hit the dog on E. Spring St, report closed.
  • Welfare Check – W. Spring St. In reference to a distress call from a vehicle. The call was made by K9 inside the vehicle, the vehicle was in motion. Everything is fine.
  • TPO Violation – Wall Street in reference to a woman having a TPO against her mother. She was trying to contact her mother through her sister.
  • Property damage – East Spring St; The complainant reported damage to the door of her Ford Mustang. Report taken.
  • Suspicious vehicle – Glen Iris – In reference to an orange loader that accelerates and drives recklessly. Zone checked, negative contact.
  • Counterfeit – Quality Foods – In reference to a counterfeit $5 bill, money was entered into evidence, report taken.
  • Hit and Run – MLK BLVD and West Spring – Two vehicles, no injuries. Maroon Chevy Equinox fled after hitting the Complainant. Report in GEARS
  • Welfare Check – E Washington St APT 34- In reference to not answering the phone for the caretaker. Negative contact. The sitter has been advised to call PD when she arrives on site
  • Fire Assist – Felker St- In reference to smoke in the house. Monroe FD and Walton FD at the scene upon arrival.
  • Suspicious Person – W Spring St; McDonalds – In reference to a white man in a black hoodie stating he would shoot someone. A man was seen driving a black tundra, area checked, contact negative.
  • Traffic Stop – S Broad and Alcovy St – Female subject arrested for running a stop sign and faulty equipment, she was arrested for driving with a suspended licence. Transported to WC prison without incident.
  • Suspicious Person – Tanglewood – In reference to the rapid gunshots heard from Tanglewood. While crossing, a named was seen walking down Tanglewood Dr. and then hiding when units attempted to make contact. He was found hiding under a vehicle. He had an active warrant out of Walton County and was charged with disorderly conduct, vagrancy and prowling and public intoxication.

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A search is underway after a woman claims her father hid dozens of bodies on his property https://club-fuer-molosser.net/a-search-is-underway-after-a-woman-claims-her-father-hid-dozens-of-bodies-on-his-property/ Wed, 26 Oct 2022 21:46:57 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/a-search-is-underway-after-a-woman-claims-her-father-hid-dozens-of-bodies-on-his-property/ Law enforcement officials scour a rural swath of land in southwestern Iowa with cadaver dogs, investigating a woman’s claim that her father murdered dozens of women and took them away. buried on his property decades before his death. “I know where the bodies are buried,” Lucy Studey told Newsweek of her efforts to help law […]]]>

Law enforcement officials scour a rural swath of land in southwestern Iowa with cadaver dogs, investigating a woman’s claim that her father murdered dozens of women and took them away. buried on his property decades before his death.

“I know where the bodies are buried,” Lucy Studey told Newsweek of her efforts to help law enforcement locate what she says may be 50 to 70 victims of her father, Donald Dean Studey. , who died in 2013 at the age of 75.

Studey, speaking to Newsweek, said as a child she and her siblings were forced to help dispose of her father’s victims at his Thurman estate, with many women abandoning a wells from 90 to 100 feet. She said most of his victims were sex workers or transients he picked up in Omaha, Nebraska, over three decades.

“He was just telling us we had to go to the well, and I knew what that meant,” she said. “All I want is for these sites to be dug up, for people to close their doors and for these women to be buried properly.”

Studey said that for years she spoke about the horrors she witnessed, but no one took her seriously. Things changed when a local Fremont County deputy said he heard rumors that her father had grown up and agreed to go with her to the five-acre property.

“She said, ‘It should be here somewhere,’ and I went out and found it,” Fremont deputy Mike Wake told Newsweek as they found the well, which had been filled. .

Fremont County Sheriff Kevin Aistrope, who did not immediately respond to HuffPost’s request for comment on Wednesday, confirmed to the Des Moines Register that they are investigating the property after spending much of the past year to obtain permission from the current owners and neighbors to search the area. .

“She’s got a hell of a story, but we don’t have any evidence of anything other than we had a dog bump on a corpse,” Aisotrope told the Register. “We need to have more evidence than that.”

Jim Peters, owner and operator of Samaritan Detection Dogs, whose dogs alerted deputies to the scent of potential human remains on the property, agreed it was too early to say anything nefarious had happened.

“If she’s making all this up and wants people to believe her, she’s doing a really good job.”

“In this case, it could be a smell related to this woman’s claims or some kind of up hill, so it could be related to a pioneer burial site, or it could be related at a Native American site,” Peters told HuffPost. “I can’t say because I don’t know.”

But based on his assessment so far and his nearly 10 years of working with law enforcement, he said Studey appeared to be a credible witness.

“What I’ve learned is to keep an open mind, especially when it comes to crime work, and if she’s making it all up and wants people to believe her, she’s doing very good work. At this point, I don’t have anything that raises a red flag with me,” he said.

According to Newsweek, which had a reporter on the scene, Studey pointed to various locations on the property where she believed people had been buried. The dogs traveled to the exact locations on their own, reporting their detection of human remains.

Peters said he was told the FBI would get more involved in the coming weeks and might bring in their dogs to help with the search. An FBI representative told HuffPost that they could neither confirm nor deny the investigation and their involvement.

Studey’s older sister, Susan Studey, denied their father was a murderer, telling Newsweek she believed any remains detected by the dogs belonged to animals or to her father’s stillborn sister, who was buried on the property.

Attempts to reach Susan and Lucy Studey for comment on Wednesday were not immediately successful.

The Iowa Criminal Investigation Division confirmed to HuffPost that it is assisting the sheriff’s office with the investigation. Assistant manager Mitch Mortvedt described it as “in the early stages with a lot of work to do” and said there was no further information available at this time.

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In the enigmatic spirit of animals https://club-fuer-molosser.net/in-the-enigmatic-spirit-of-animals/ Mon, 24 Oct 2022 09:00:00 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/in-the-enigmatic-spirit-of-animals/ By affirming its ambition “to explore their senses to better understand their lives,” Yong is true to his word. A longtime Atlantic staffer, he has an Attenborough-like knack for unearthing simple stories from the boundless mess of the natural world. A look at the eyes of scallops, for example, becomes a window through which to […]]]>

By affirming its ambition “to explore their senses to better understand their lives,” Yong is true to his word. A longtime Atlantic staffer, he has an Attenborough-like knack for unearthing simple stories from the boundless mess of the natural world. A look at the eyes of scallops, for example, becomes a window through which to marvel at the dozens, if not hundreds, of wobbly eyeballs attached to this seafood staple. Yong describes the scallops’ visit to the berry with eyes like “neon blueberries”. When threatened, the creatures beat furiously to freedom, “opening and closing their shells like panicked castanets”.

A huge worldThe most revealing anecdotes are those that turn our worldview upside down and help us understand how evolutionary pressures have structured physical reality. He tells us that bees, like us, have trichromatic eyes – they perceive three primary colors. In their case, however, the light-sensitive cells are tuned to green, blue, and ultraviolet. “You might think these pollinators evolved eyes that see flowers well, but that’s not what happened,” he writes. “Their style of trichromacy evolved hundreds of millions of years before the first flowers appeared, so the latter must have evolved to match the first ones. The flowers developed colors that ideally tickle the eyes of insects.

Unlike Yong, Jackie Higgins sees the talents of animals as a lens on our own faculties. Higgins, who was a science filmmaker for the BBC before becoming an author, centers each chapter of Sensitive about an animal’s remarkable sensory adaptation, but takes anecdotal diversions, à la Oliver Sacks, to explore cases at the edge of human capacity. To be inspired by The Naked Monkey– Desmond Morris’ mix of zoology and hippie-era ethnography that interpreted human behavior as the result of a speculative evolutionary grand narrative – she values ​​the study of animals as “a mirror we can hold up to satisfy self-obsession,” adding that “it offers another perspective on why we humans look, act, and feel the way we do.

“We don’t see with our eyes, but with our brains. Likewise, we don’t hear with our ears alone, smell with our nose, taste with our tongue, or feel with our finger sensors alone.

Paul Bach-y-Rita

There’s the peacock mantis shrimp, which has the most complex eyes discovered to date (with 12 types of photoreceptors out of our three), and the star-nosed mole, which packs six times as many touch sensors into its flared snout. a centimeter wide than you have in a whole hand. Each chapter sheds light on a meaning, so that in considering color vision, she associates the example of the shrimp with those of humans struggling with their own equivalent sense: the inhabitants of Pingelap Atoll, for example , “the island of the color-blind,” and an anonymous Englishwoman, codenamed cDa29, who has a fourth type of photoreceptor that allows her to see millions of colors invisible to the rest of us.

Reading Higgins, we spend more time with an organ that seems deliberately unprobed by Yong: the brain. For her, the brain is everywhere, necessarily as “the most important sensory organ of our body”. Paraphrasing the American neuroscientist Paul Bach-y-Rita, Higgins writes: “We do not see with our eyes, but with our brains. Likewise, we don’t hear with our ears alone, smell with our nose, taste with our tongue, or feel with our finger sensors alone. In Sensitive, we learn that, distributed throughout the human brain, we can find a “sensory homunculus”, a tactile map of the body with oversized areas corresponding to our hands and lips, reflecting the density of tactile sensors in these areas. There are animal equivalents – “mouseunculus”, “raccoonunculus”, “platypunculus”, and star-nosed “moleunculus” – which also represent the primacy of these species’ sensitive whiskers and noses. Indeed, the most touching sections of the book come closest to the mind, such as the chapter on the “slow track” of the skin, the tactile system that responds to the caress. The system is found in social mammals, including ourselves, but also vampire bats, which have been observed donating blood to each other after benevolent licks. It’s a rare sense that doesn’t communicate so much information as mood: “By attuning us to tenderness, Higgins writes, it transforms touch into interpersonal glue and the skin into a social organ”.

ARI LILOAN

By this, we learn that most of what makes up the perceptual world is built in the darkness of our head rather than in the sensory organs themselves, whose role is limited to translating stimuli into electrical signals. Yet while Higgins and Yong conclude that we can truly understand a great deal about what it is to be another creature, we wonder about this central organ, having failed to build a clear picture of the brain of another species – its structure and functioning – nor elucidated much of what is going on inside: its cognition or thought. Enter Philip Ball The Book of Spirits. For Ball, the senses are just a way to access a wide-ranging exploration that begins with the animal spirit and goes through consciousness, artificial intelligence, extraterrestrials and free will. His book asks: What kinds of minds exist, or could exist, beyond our own? Ball, a prolific science writer and former editor of the journal Nature, also launches into a story of Sacks, who recalls leaning his big, bearded face against the window of a mother orangutan’s enclosure at the zoo. of Toronto. As each placed a hand against opposite sides of the glass, Sacks wrote, the two furry primates shared a “snapshot, mutual recognition and sense of kinship.”

While it’s unclear if we can know what it’s like to be a bat, it seemed obvious to Sacks that what it’s like to be an orangutan isn’t only knowable, but something we can easily guess. Ball’s exploration of the minds of others negotiates this path between solipsism – the skeptical philosophical position that none of us can know anything beyond our own minds – and anthropomorphism, which naively projects our own qualities on non-humans. According to him, humans, bats and orangutans are just three examples in a “space of possible minds” that could also include AI, aliens and angels.

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Gas companies send Pro-Gas coloring books to schools https://club-fuer-molosser.net/gas-companies-send-pro-gas-coloring-books-to-schools/ Fri, 21 Oct 2022 20:25:34 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/gas-companies-send-pro-gas-coloring-books-to-schools/ Like most forms of energy, natural gas has quite a long list of pros and cons – it’s a better choice than some, but a worse choice than others. No matter how you slice it, however, there are proven concerns about natural gas’s contribution to climate change as well as considerable evidence that natural gas […]]]>

Like most forms of energy, natural gas has quite a long list of pros and cons – it’s a better choice than some, but a worse choice than others. No matter how you slice it, however, there are proven concerns about natural gas’s contribution to climate change as well as considerable evidence that natural gas fumes can harm children’s health.

There’s also no doubt that natural gas is big business – and it looks like Big Gas will do what it can to cultivate positive public opinion and keep the money flowing…even if that means taking a page from the tobacco companies and sending its biased messages directly to impressionable kids.

Across the country, parents and schools are reporting that gas companies are sending home coloring books and pro-gas activity books with kids that emphasize all the good and downplay the bad.

Read more: Researchers rip gas stoves out of their homes for the health of their children

In Oregon, the NW Natural utility sent activity books to schools statewide in May, in English and Spanish. Children as young as five received packages which, for the youngest, showed a friendly mouse called “Nat” and a cat called “Gus” learning all about the benefits of natural gas. Although energy security and conservation are sometimes mentioned, the activities mainly focus on the vital importance of natural gas and why it is better than “dirtier” forms of energy such as diesel. Cleaner forms of energy, such as electricity or solar, are conspicuously absent, of course.

“I find it dangerous to be honest. I find it dangerous because he is trying to influence the next generation in how they think about fossil gas as a service,” Jaimini Parekh, senior counsel at Earthjustice, told DeSmog at the time. “Why does a utility company feel so threatened that they have to try to influence the minds of children as they think about the impacts of gas?”

Meanwhile, in Oklahoma, children were taught natural gas lessons by “Petro Pete” and his dog “Repete,” courtesy of Oklahoma Oil & Natural Gas. Pete and his dog have some interesting things to say, such as “humans have learned their lesson and now they don’t leave a mess when they drill for oil,” according to Bloomberg.

And last year, Puget Sound Energy encouraged kids to color in a picture of ‘Natural Gas Town’ – although after tweeting it they quickly deleted it amid criticism.

Finally, in Massachusetts, the children of several schools received activity books so that they could learn more about their “invisible friend”: natural gas, of course.

At least one dad wasn’t happy with what he found in his child’s backpack.

“Beyond anger,” he wrote on Twitter. “My son brought these propaganda books from his Tobin Primary School in Cambridge. Courtesy of @EversourceMA gas. Not a single mention of the climate crisis. Contemptible.”

Why does this happen?

“Industry groups recognized the value of classrooms for marketing and propaganda decades ago,” Carroll Muffett, president and CEO of the Center for International Environmental Law, told Bloomberg. “This is where you shape someone’s understanding of your product, your business, and your issues. In a school setting, you shape their understanding of the world.

And often the books get passed over by school administrations because they contain safety information, like what kids should do if they smell a strange smell in their house. But safety is obviously not the main objective.

“There’s no way the main purpose of this is to inform children of the potential they could dig into the sidewalk and damage a pipeline. That’s not what these pamphlets are,” Parekh continued, explaining to DeSmog. “Not in any way. Like Little Billy and his baseball bat that was made by the gas company…it’s not about the safety of the distribution system.

In fact, natural gas can be harmful to young children, especially children with lung problems like asthma. Specifically, several studies have found that homes using natural gas stoves for cooking produce dangerous levels of air pollutants that can seriously affect young children.

Another not-so-great aspect of these activity books? People who use natural gas in their homes pay for these campaigns every time they pay a bill. Of course, that sounds like small potatoes compared to research that shows natural gas could harm our earth and our children.

Currently, there are no federal regulations preventing gas companies (or other types of companies) from distributing information to schools or schools from distributing it to children.

Scary Mommy reached out to three of the gas companies above for comment, but received no response.

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Best Drools Dog Food for Pet Dogs https://club-fuer-molosser.net/best-drools-dog-food-for-pet-dogs/ Wed, 19 Oct 2022 09:02:38 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/best-drools-dog-food-for-pet-dogs/ We are all looking for a diet that is best for our well-being. We look for foods that contain all the nutrients we need to build a healthy body. Likewise, our dear canine friends also deserve the very best in nutrition. Drools Dog Food offers a wide range of dog food to meet this need. […]]]>

We are all looking for a diet that is best for our well-being. We look for foods that contain all the nutrients we need to build a healthy body. Likewise, our dear canine friends also deserve the very best in nutrition. Drools Dog Food offers a wide range of dog food to meet this need. We will see what options are available from Drooling dog food and which is best for you.

The best Drools dog food for your canine friend

1. Drools Chicken & Egg Adult Dry Dog Food, 3kg with 1.2kg free

Drooling dog food
Drools Chicken & Egg Adult Dog Dry Food, 3kg with 1.2kg free

Drools Dog Chicken contains real chicken as its primary ingredient, which helps maintain lean muscle mass and peak body condition in your dog.

A wonderful mixture of components has the advantages of vitamins and mineralswhich help maintain healthy bones and a functioning digestive system.

Drools dog food is high in protein and contains the appropriate proportions of other nutrients, providing your pet with the greatest possible health benefits.

Croquettes which have been specially developed contribute to the prevention of tartar build-up.

Drools dog food is ideal for all types and sizes of dogs.

This 3kg Drools dog food comes with a free 1.2kg pack, and the price is Rs. 594.

Buy now on Amazon:

2. Drools Gourmet Bites Chicken Pieces in Gravy, Wet Food for Adult Dogs, Recipe by Sanjeev Kapoor

Drools Gourmet Bites Chicken Pieces in Gravy, Wet Food for Adult Dogs, Recipe by Sanjeev Kapoor

You’ll love that Sanjeev Kapoor, the creator of Drools Gourmet Bites Adult Gravy, made sure your canine companion enjoys every bite.

This farmhouse recipe starts with real chicken tossed with a healthy blend of natural foods including pumpkin, brussels sprouts, green beans and peas packed with wholesome ingredients that make it delicious and flavorful.

Pumpkin, Brussels sprouts, green beans and peas are all examples of these superfoods. This sauce can be served alone or with dry kibble to offer a more interesting meal.

This mixture, which contains an appropriate amount of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acidspromotes healthy brain, eye and cognitive development and leaves the coat shiny and healthy overall.

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3. Drools Puppy Wet Dog Food, real chicken and pieces of chicken liver in sauce

Drools Puppy Wet Dog Food, real chicken and pieces of chicken liver in sauce

This Drools dog food is a nutritious meal that promotes healthy brain and eye development in puppies.

A higher percentage of water to maintain a healthy digestive tract is available in pocket containers.

The presence of vitamins and other organic components help maintain bone health and strengthen teeth.

Your dog stays alert and nimble all day with real chicken, chicken liver and chicken eggs.

This tasty food contains all-natural elements that promote healthy skin and a shiny coat for your canine companion.

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4. Drools Ultium Performance Adult Dog Food

Drools Ultium Performance Adult Dog Food

This Drools adult dog food contains high quality real chickena mix of vitamins and minerals which ensure that your pet can get all the vital health benefits. It promotes excellent muscle growth and development, which improves your pet’s overall agility and performance.

The people at Drools understand the enormous passion people have for their pets and the importance of providing them with healthy, nutritious food. As a result, their nutritionists and veterinarians have worked together to develop excellent quality pet food to meet the changing needs of pets.

Not only that, but extensive research has also ensured that every product made by Drools has a consistent flavor, better digestibility and better absorption.

These items have been nutritionally analyzed and subjected to strict quality control procedures to ensure that only the highest quality food will end up in your pet’s bowl.

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5. Drools Absolute Salmon Oil Syrup – Dog Supplement

Drools Absolute Salmon Oil Syrup – Dog Supplement

Drools Absolute Salmon Oil is a daily supplement that supports skin and coat health by providing a high level of EPA and DHAtwo of most beneficial omega-3 fatty acids.

Most dogs can absorb this syrup extremely quickly and effortlessly, and their metabolism uses the nutrients directly without the need for conversion.

For this reason, it is beneficial for your dog’s immune system, joint health and general well-being.

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6. Drools Maintenance Dry Dog Food for Adult Dogs, Chicken Flavor, 22kg (20kg with 2kg inside free)

Drools Maintenance Dry Dog Food for Adult Dogs, Chicken Flavor, 22 kg (20 kg with 2 kg inside free)

This Drools dog food is enhanced with Bioplex, Mycosorb and Yea-Sacc for a more favorable result regarding the overall performance of the animal.

The presence of vital amino acids, vitamins and minerals helps maintain a smooth, shiny coat.

The high protein content of the diet promotes healthy growth and the development of strong muscles.

It improves your pet’s health and digestive capacity at the same time.

All raw materials undergo rigorous testing in nutritional laboratories to ensure that they meet the required quality and safety requirements.

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7. Drools Vet Pro Skin and Coat 3kg Dog Food for Healthy Skin and Coat

Drools Vet Pro Skin and Coat 3 kg Dog food for healthy skin and coat

VET PRO Skin + Coat is a complete, balanced and easily nutritious all-breed food suitable for adult dogs. It contains increased levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids, vitamins, proteins, organic zinc and selenium.

Improper diet, food allergies and food intolerances are all potentially serious conditions that can cause the skin and coat to be sensitive or inflamed.

It Drools dog food is suggested by veterinarians too. This meal is designed to support and help your dog overcome skin issues and maintain healthy skin and coat.

Vet-Pro Skin + Coat is the answer to treating your pup’s inflamed skin and coat due to food sensitivity and other issues that may have contributed to these symptoms.

It is the right food because it includes easily digestible carbohydrates, proteins, omega fatty acids and other important elements.

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8. Drools Puppy Starter Dry Dog Food, Chicken Flavor

Drools Puppy Starter Dry Dog Food, Chicken Flavor

This Drools dog food is a unique formulation for puppies, nursing mothers and pregnant female dogs.

Vitamins and minerals are needed in increased amounts in pregnant and lactating female dogs.

This Drools Starter dog food contains DHAwhich makes puppies smarter and stronger, as well as high quality proteinwhich promotes optimal growth and development.

It is made from a formula that is gentle on the digestive tract and contains no more than 2.5% crude fiber.

It contains an extract of Yucca for the treatment of stool odours.

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Conclusion

Drools Dog food offers a wide variety of dog food for all breeds of dogs. The stream is high quality, affordable, and readily available. Give your beloved pet a daily dose of healthy food from Drools Dog Food.

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Festival writers write on a variety of topics – Times-Standard https://club-fuer-molosser.net/festival-writers-write-on-a-variety-of-topics-times-standard/ Sun, 16 Oct 2022 10:37:51 +0000 https://club-fuer-molosser.net/festival-writers-write-on-a-variety-of-topics-times-standard/ Twenty-four writers are coming to Eureka for the 2022 Humboldt County Children’s Author Festival. Fourteen are returning participants. They are Caroline Arnold, Bob Barner, Larry Brimner, Erik Brooks, Judy Cox, Barry Deutsch, Dan Gemeinhart, Kelly Milner Halls, Valerie Hobbs, Kirby Larson, Bethanie Murguia, Alexis O’Neill, Rosanne Parry and Greg Trine. Each writes for a variety […]]]>

Twenty-four writers are coming to Eureka for the 2022 Humboldt County Children’s Author Festival.

Fourteen are returning participants. They are Caroline Arnold, Bob Barner, Larry Brimner, Erik Brooks, Judy Cox, Barry Deutsch, Dan Gemeinhart, Kelly Milner Halls, Valerie Hobbs, Kirby Larson, Bethanie Murguia, Alexis O’Neill, Rosanne Parry and Greg Trine. Each writes for a variety of ages and on a wide range of topics.

• Caroline Arnold of Los Angeles writes and illustrates books on natural history. Most of its more than 100 titles are designed for young elementary school children. His books include “Five Nests”, “Planting a Garden in Room 6” and “Living Fossils: Clues to the Past”.

• Bob Barner of San Francisco is a picture book author and illustrator whose works include “Dem Bones”, “My Dog Has Fleas” and many more.

• Larry Brimner lives in Tucson, Arizona. He writes picture books and easy reads for young children and also tackles serious social issues for older students. Some of his books include “Blacklisted!”, “Twelve Days in May”, and “Puppy & Bear”.

• Erik Brooks resides in Washington State, where he writes and illustrates picture books for ages 3-8. One of his favorite subjects is polar bears and fittingly one of his books is called ‘Polar Opposites’.

“I got my first invitation (to the festival) in 2008 or 2010 maybe and I’m still on the newer side versus some of the guest writers,” Brooks said. “During this very first year, I had illustrated a book by a longtime participant, Shirley Climo (since passed), it was a wonderful opportunity for me to meet the author of my first illustrated book. Each participation since has been based on that first fantastic experience.

He added: “More than twenty authors come together to share their personal joys and experiences of writing and illustrating for children. We go to schools to talk about our work and we have a little time in the evening to visiting our peers. There aren’t many other events like this in the country, so it’s always an easy ‘yes’ when I’m asked to come back.

• Judy Cox from Oregon writes for a variety of ages. Her titles include “Sheep Won’t Sleep”, “The Secret of the Doolittle Device” and “Carmen Learns English”.

• Barry Deutsch is also from Oregon. He is a cartoonist and has created a series of graphic novels featuring a young Orthodox Jewish heroine named Mirka.

• Washington State’s Dan Gemeinhart writes juvenile novels for older students. Some of his books include “The Midnight Children”, “Good Dog”, and “The Honest Truth”.

• Kelly Milner Halls is also from Washington. Some of his most popular books deal with aliens, ghosts, monsters, and Sasquatch. Halls – whose titles include “Saving the Baghdad Zoo”, “Dinosaur Parade” and “Albino Animals” – has been part of the local authors’ festival on several occasions.

“Audacity Jones to the Rescue” is a book by Washington-based children’s author Kirby Larson. (With kind permission of the author)

“If you’re lucky as a writer, you meet dedicated people who work to encourage kids to unleash the power of reading,” Halls said. “The Humboldt County Children’s Author Festival team is made up of dedicated magicians. I do the festival when asked because I feel honored to be part of their team and because I love children as much as they do.

• Valerie Hobbs lives in Santa Barbara, where she writes novels for high school and college students. His book titles include “The Last Best Days of Summer”, “Wolf”, “Defiance” and more.

• Washington State’s Kirby Larson writes primarily for elementary school students, but won a Newberry Medal of Honor for her young adult novel “Hattie Big Sky.” She has also written a number of books about real-life canine heroes.

“It’s important to me to support author/book festivals whenever I can and especially in the case of the Humboldt County Festival which is fully funded and organized by caring community members in the area. of Eureka,” Larson said. “Typically, author festivals are hosted by school districts or universities with a connection to children’s literature or even cities, so this event is unique.”

• Bethanie Murguia of Sausalito writes and illustrates picture books. His titles include “We Disagree”, “The Too Scary Story”, “Toucans, Too” and others.

• Alexis O’Neill of Simi Valley also writes picture books including ‘Recess Queen’ which is her take on the subject of bullying and is used in many programs to understand and deal with the subject. Some of his other titles include “Estela’s Swap”, “The Worst Best Friend”, and “Jacob Riis’s Camera: Bringing Light to Tenement Children”.
• Rosanne Parry from Oregon writes juvenile novels, including “Last of the Name”, “A Wolf Called Wander” and “A Whale of the Wild”.
• Greg Trine is from Ventura. Some of his titles – written for the 7-10 age group – include “Max Odor Does Not Stink”, “George at the Speed ​​of Light”, and “Goldilocks Private Eye”. He has been part of the local authors’ festival about five times, he said.
“I’m a big fan of the area, and some of my colleagues had been coming here for years, so I bugged the people running the festival for an invite,” said Trine, who says as a author, he enjoys “creating something new and making people laugh.

New this year

Ten new authors are also participating in the 2022 Humboldt County Children’s Author Festival. They are:

• Sudipta Bardhan-Quallen from New Jersey writes rhyming picture books like “Chicks Rock!” and “The Tyrannosaurus Wrecks”.

• Carlene Meredith Cogliati, who lives near Maple Creek, writes and illustrates picture books and stories for older readers. Two of his books, “To Durchhalten” and “The House That Bill Built”, are set in Humboldt County.

• Cathryn Falwell from Maine writes and illustrates books for young children, including “Turtle Splash!” which combines natural history with a subtraction lesson. A few of his other titles are “Word Wizard”, “Butterflies for Kiri”, and “Pond Babies”.

• Jenny Sue Kostecki-Shaw is originally from New Mexico, but spent time in Humboldt County researching her book “Luna & Me” about eco-activist Julia Butterfly Hill. One of his other books, “Same, Same but Different”, is a series of letters between pen pals Elliot in the United States and Kallash in India.

• Martha Longshore of Humboldt County writes as Rowan Mallory. Her book, “The Blacksmith Princess”, was inspired by Grimm’s twelve dancing princesses and is the first in a planned series of works inspired by fairy tales.

• Rocklin’s Connie McLennan was inspired by the redwood forests of the North Coast for her 2019 picture book, “The Forest in the Trees.” She has also illustrated a host of children’s books over the years.

• Lisa Papp from Pennsylvania has written and illustrated several books on therapy dogs, including “Madeline Finn and the Library Dog”.

• Carrie Pearson from Michigan writes books that celebrate the natural world. His book “Stretch to the Sun” also features local redwoods. His other titles include “A Warm Winter Tail” and “A Cool Summer Tail”.

• Lori R. Snyder, formerly of Humboldt County, now resides in Playa del Rey. His mid-level book “The Circus at the End of the Sea” is set in Venice Beach near Los Angeles and is about an emotional journey of discovery.

• Jasmine Warga from Illinois writes books for older readers. Some of his titles include “Here We Are Now”, “The Shape of Thunder” and “Other Words for Home” about a young Syrian girl who leaves with her pregnant mother to come and live with an uncle in America.

To learn more about the 2022 Humboldt County Children’s Author Festival attendees, visit https://www.authorfest.org/.

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